Text: A A A

Speakers' Biographies and Topics

Conference Patron

Keynote Speakers

General Speakers

 

Canadian Senator Elizabeth Marshall

Canadian Senator Elizabeth Marshall - Conference Patron

Elizabeth E. Marshall (BETH) is currently a Canadian Senator, having previously spent 30 years with the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. Since 1979, Beth has occupied a number of positions in provincial public service including Deputy Minister of Transportation and Works, Deputy Minister of Social Services, as well as a number of positions in the Department of Finance. She was appointed Auditor General of Newfoundland and Labrador in 1992 and served in that position until 2002. In 2003 she was elected MHA for the district of Topsail and was re-elected in 2007. She served as Minister of Health and Community Services from 2003-2004. She was appointed to the Canadian Senate in January 2010. Beth graduated from Memorial University with a Bachelor of Science degree and qualified as a CA in 1978 and was admitted to the Institute of Chartered Accountants in 1979. In April, 2011, Beth received her FCA designation, which is the highest honor one can receive as a Chartered Accountant.

Beth is married to Stan Marshall and they reside in the Town of Paradise.

^ Top of Page

 

Senator Elizabeth Marshall, our Official Patron of the IAWP Conference, is very pleased to announce the following have been secured to date as presenters:

 

General Rick Hillier (Retired)

General R.J Hillier (Retired) - Keynote Speaker

Former Chief of the Defence Staff for Canadian Forces,
the Canadian Forces' Highest Rank

As the patron for Women in Defence and Security, Retired General Hillier will certainly be an engaging and compelling speaker for our delegates.

General Hillier's Profile

Born in Newfoundland and Labrador, General Rick Hillier joined the Canadian Forces as soon as he could. Having enrolled in the Canadian Forces in 1973 through the Regular Officer Training Plan program, he graduated from Memorial University of Newfoundland in 1975 with a Bachelor of Science Degree. After completing his armour officer classification training, he joined his first regiment, the 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise's) in Petawawa, Ontario. Subsequently, he served with, and later commanded, the Royal Canadian Dragoons in Canada and Germany.

Throughout his career, General Hillier has had the privilege and pleasure of commanding troops from the platoon to multi-national formation level within Canada, Europe, Asia and the United States. He has worked as a staff officer in several headquarters, first at the Army level in Montreal and later at the strategic level in Ottawa.

In 1998 General Hillier was appointed as the first Canadian Deputy Commanding General of III Corps, US Army in Fort Hood, Texas. In 2000 he took command of NATO's Stabilization Force's (SFOR) Multinational Division (Southwest) in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

In May 2003 General Hillier was appointed as Commander of the Army and subsequently, in October 2003, he was selected as the Commander of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Kabul, Afghanistan.

General Hillier was promoted to his present rank and assumed duties as the Chief of the Defence Staff on 4 February 2005.

General Hillier and his wife have two sons, a daughter-in-law, and a new grandson. General Hillier enjoys most recreational pursuits but, in particular, runs slowly, plays hockey poorly and golf’s not well at all.

He retired from the Canadian Forces in July 2008.

Presentation Topic:

The former Chief of Defense Staff of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Patron of Women in Defense and Security will speak on Motivation and Leadership. In his Presentation titled The Challenge of Leadership in Tough Times General Hillier will talk about the lessons from the school of hard knocks that are applicable to us all.

^ Top of Page

Lieutenant-General The Honorable Roméo A. Dallaire

Lieutenant-General The Honorable Roméo A. Dallaire, O.C., C.M.M., G.O.Q., M.S.C., C.D., L.O.M. (U.S.) (Retired), B.ésS., LL.D. (Hon.), D.Sc.Mil (Hon.), D.U. , Senator, Senate of Canada

Biographical Sketch: Roméo Dallaire is a Canadian Senator and retired Canadian Army Lieutenant-General. A devoted humanitarian, Lieutenant General (LGen) Dallaire is President of the Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire Foundation; founder of the Child Soldiers Initiative, a project aimed at eradicating the use of child soldiers; an outspoken advocate for Human Rights, particularly War-Affected Children, Women, the Canadian First Nations, and Military Veterans; a respected champion of Genocide Prevention initiatives, the Responsibility to Protect doctrine, and Nuclear Non-Proliferation, as well as a best-selling author.

A former Fellow of the Carr Centre for Human Right Policy, the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, he was named, in September 2006, The Senior Fellow of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies at Concordia University and co-directed its Will to Intervene project. He is a co-author of Mobilizing the Will to Intervene: Leadership to Prevent Mass Atrocities (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2011), the book that resulted from that project, and continues in his role as MIGS Senior Fellow.

Most notably, LGen Dallaire was appointed Force Commander of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Rwanda (UNAMIR) prior to and during the 1994 genocide. LGen Dallaire provided the United Nations with information about the planned massacre, which ultimately took more than 800,000 lives in less than 100 days yet permission to intervene was denied and the UN withdrew its peacekeeping forces. LGen Dallaire, along with a small contingent of Ghanaian soldiers and military observers, disobeyed the command to withdraw and remained in Rwanda to fulfill their ethical obligation to protect those who sought refuge with the UN forces.

His courage and leadership during this mission earned him the Meritorious Service Cross, the United States Legion of Merit, the Aegis Award on Genocide Prevention, and the affection and admiration of people around the globe. His defiant dedication to humanity during that mission is well-documented (e.g. The Last Just Man, Shake Hands with the Devil: The Journey of Romeo Dallaire, The Lion, The Fox, and The Eagle), as are the personal consequences he continues to suffer and his subsequent commitment to fellow victims of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Upon being medically released from the Canadian Army in 2000, LGen Dallaire has served on the UN Advisory Committee on Genocide Prevention, as Special Advisor to the Minister of Veterans Affairs Canada, as Advisor to the Minister of National Defense, and as Special Advisor to the Minister responsible for the Canadian International Development Agency on matters relating to War Affected Children.

LGen Dallaire was born in Denekamp, Holland, on 25 June 1946, to Canadian Army Sergeant Roméo Louis Dallaire and Catherine Johanna Dallaire. He was raised and educated in Canada, joining le Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean in 1964 (later assuming command of this institution as Brigadier-General in 1989), and graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree from the Royal Military College in 1969. He also attended the Canadian Land Forces Command and Staff College, the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College in Virginia, and the United Kingdom Higher Command & Staff Course. LGen Dallaire holds honorary doctorates and fellowships from over two dozen universities in Canada and the United States.

LGen Dallaire is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Grand Officer of the National Order of Quebec, and a Commander of the Order of Military Merit. He is the recipient of the United Nations Association of Canada’s Pearson Peace Medal, the Arthur Kroeger College Award for Ethics in Public Affairs from Carleton University, the Laureate of Excellence from the Manitoba Health Sciences Centre, and the Harvard University Humanist Award.

He is author of two best-selling books. His harrowing experiences in Rwanda are detailed in Shake Hands with the Devil – the Failure of Humanity in Rwanda, which won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Non-Fiction in 2004 and the “Shaughnessy Cohen Prize” for political writing awarded by the Writers' Trust of Canada. It provided the basis for an Emmy Award-winning documentary as well as a major motion picture of the same name; it has also been entered into evidence in war crimes tribunals trying the perpetrators of the Rwandan genocide. LGen Dallaire’s most recent book, They Fight Like Soldiers; They Die Like Children – the Global Quest to Eradicate the Use of Child Soldiers, introduces the Child Soldier phenomenon and solutions to eradicate it: a mission to which LGen Dallaire has committed the rest of his life.

Presentation Topic:

Having spent 13 months as force commander of the UN intervention in Rwanda, a decorated Lieutenant General, Dallaire can speak on a variety of topics, illustrated with stories of his own experiences.

^ Top of Page

André Baker QPM, LLB (Hons), AKC.

André Baker QPM, LLB (Hons), AKC.

Andy joined the Metropolitan Police in July 1975, serving the majority of his 30 years as a detective in the Criminal Investigation Department at Scotland Yard. When promoted to chief police officer in ACPO, he held the portfolios for all homicide investigations in London, the drugs directorate, prevention of serious crime and the New Scotland Yard Crime Academy. On the national / international platform, he was the vice-chairman of the ACPO National Homicide Working Group and held the ACPO portfolios for Honour Based Violence, Family Liaison and Europol.

He has held both investigative and strategic responsibilities for many complicated and high profile investigations. He worked as an intelligence officer, was a manager on the Bexley project for child sexual abuse (the forerunner of the national child protection team programme) and he also designed the first rape crisis centre in London and the Home Counties. He was the team leader on the SID project; designing intelligence led policing in the MPS – the first such proactive intelligence system combining community intelligence and support with covert methodologies in the world. He is a trained Hostage Negotiator.

In January 2006, Andy joined the Serious Organised Crime Agency, UK. He held the position of Deputy Director, Intelligence Directorate Surveillance for the first three years. From 1st April 2009, he became the DD in the Intervention Headquarters department where he retained responsibilities for strategic partnerships with the HQ functions. From April 2011, he was appointed head of the newly formed Prevention department; this included working with both the private and public sectors tackling matters of Fraud, OIC, drugs and Cyber Crime. He also led for the UK on tackling Intellectual Property Crime. From October 2011 he was transferred as the Deputy CEO and Chief Operating Officer for CEOP, the UK’s national agency tackling child (sexual) exploitation.

He has an honours degree in Laws, a diploma in Applied Criminal Psychology (Cambridge) and is an Associate of Kings College London. In 1994 he graduated from the FBI National Academy in Quantico, USA.

In the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2005, Andy was awarded a Queen’s Police Medal for services to policing.

Presentation Topic:

Head of the Serious and Organized Crime Agency in the U.K. and an expert in Human Trafficking. Commander Baker will present on Human Trafficking and “Adam’s Story” - an international murder and multi-investigation into the torso of a 4 year old trafficked Nigerian boy in the Thames River.

^ Top of Page

Shindo Kaur Barquer

Chief Inspector Shindo Kaur Barquer

LLB (Hons) MSc PGCE

Shindo was the first Sikh female to join West Midlands Police UK in 1987, for over 25 years Shindo has worked both in specialist and operational policing roles.

Throughout her career Shindo has been a keen volunteer herself, mentoring colleagues within and outside the organisation. She has actively supported police recruitment campaigns.

She is passionate about raising awareness of honour related crimes and has continued to promote the complexities of arranged marriages. As a key note speaker she attended the International Women’s Law Enforcement Conference in Darwin, Australia in 2008.

Shindo was promoted to Chief Inspector in 2009 as Head of Resilience in Operations; she is a qualified Silver CBRN Commander and has experience of working with multi agencies for the preparedness for any emergency and the management of the community risk register. Shindo currently has responsibility for Operations at Birmingham South Local Operational Unit.

Presentation Topic:

West Midlands Police, UK. C/Insp. Barquer will present on her personal journey “The power of allowing yourself.” C/Insp Barquer will talk about her childhood in a very conservative Sikh community when at the age of 10 years old her family started to plan a wedding for her and map out her life. C/Insp Barquer will relate her struggles and how she overcame this and joined the police service and why it is important to desire to inspire others.

^ Top of Page

Constable Todd Barron

Constable Todd Barron

Todd Barron is a Constable with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (RNC) who has 22 years of service. Currently, Todd is the primary polygraph examiner for the RNC. He is also responsible for training members of the criminal investigation division and new police recruits on the PEACE model of interviewing; developing new interviewing courses; and providing advice on interviewing protocols for ongoing investigations. He is a member of the international Investigative Interviewing Research Group (iIIRG), the Canadian Association of Police Polygraphists (CAPP), and has received training on the PEACE model of interviewing (advanced suspect interviewing) in the United Kingdom. Todd's research interests pertain to the development of professional and ethical interviewing standards.

Presentation Topic:

Professor Brent Snook and Constable Todd Barron

Professor Snook, an Associate Professor of Psychology at Memorial University of Newfoundland, and Cst. Barron a police officer with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, will jointly conduct a presentation on suspect interviewing using the PEACE Model.

^ Top of Page

James O. Beasley II

James O. Beasley II

Mr. Beasley has been a Special Agent with the FBI for over twenty-eight years. He served in three field divisions – Kansas City, Missouri; San Antonio, Texas; and Newark, New Jersey. He later served as a Supervisory Special Agent Document Examiner in the FBI Laboratory in Washington, D.C., and then as a Supervisory Senior Resident Agent in the FBI’s Sacramento, California, field division, where he managed violent crime investigations in that division’s Fresno, California, Resident Agency. He is currently a Supervisory Special Agent in the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime – Behavioral Analysis Unit, which is a component of the Critical Incident Response Group’s Investigative and Operations Support Section, based at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia. Over the past twelve years, he has participated in behavioral assessments of offenders in violent crime investigations, with special emphasis on crimes against children, serial murder, and cyber offenses. He has also conducted research and published articles on child abduction and serial murder, based on his interviews with incarcerated offenders and extensive analyses of their backgrounds and relevant case records. He received a B.S. degree in psychology from Central Missouri State University at Warrensburg, and a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Missouri at Kansas City.

Presentation Topic:

Mr Beasley has been a Special Agent with the FBI for over 28 years. He will conduct a presentation on Offender Behavioral Considerations in Child Pornography Investigations. This presentation will focus on offender behaviors as identified and studied by the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit 3 (Child Crimes & Cyber Crimes), augmented by case examples that explain preferential vs. situational child sex offenders, as well as other perspectives from the mental health and law enforcement perspectives.

Through case examples and offender interviews, this presentation will address how the analysis of offender behaviors can assist law enforcement personnel in child pornography and child sex offender investigations. The program includes the results of years of experience by personnel in the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit, both from the research aspect as well as from case investigations in which BAU personnel provided direct behavioral assistance.

^ Top of Page

Deputy Police Commissioner (North) Amena Begam

Amena Begam joined Bangladesh Police in the year 1999 and belongs to the third batch of women in supervisory level police officer. She is now serving as Deputy Police Commissioner (North), Chittagong Metropolitan Police (CMP). Amena did her Masters from Chittagong University in English literature. She served in different capacities of policing. She worked in Metropolitan Police Chittagong, Traffic Police, Armed Police Battalion, District Police and United Nations Peace Keeping Mission. She was the Deputy Commander of Bangladesh Formed Police Unit in UNMIT 2006-2007. She has also served as Additional SP in Rangamati Hill Districts in 2007. Amena is the founding member of Bangladesh Police Women Network (BPWN) which was inaugurated in 2008 . Amena was elected Region 15 coordinator of IAWP in 2009 Seattle Conference. As a member of BPWN she got the tremendous support of the biggest member country of IAWP. IAWP has 194 members from Bangladesh Police and the largest member state in the Region.

Presentation Topic:

IAWP President Jane Townsley, Deputy Chief Leanne Fitch, and Deputy Commissioner Amena Begum

Together, they will conduct a First-Time Attendees Workshop which will provide an overview of the conference training and activities. You will be introduced to the IAWP president Jane Townsley, who will discuss the history, mission, and goals of the IAWP and the 2012 conference. Hear tips to take advantage of all opportunities that IAWP has to offer. Learn why some consider the networking opportunities at the conference, and through the organization, to be among one of the most important opportunities for women working in law enforcement. Hear the personal experience of how IAWP made a change in the professional and personal life of one of its members. THIS SESSION IS SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR FIRST TIME ATTENDEES ONLY.

^ Top of Page

Gwen Boniface

Transnations Organized Crime Expert, United Nations. Police Division, New York, U.S.A.; former Commissioner Ontario Provincial Police.

Gwen Boniface, Commissioner (retired) is a Transnational Organized Crime Expert with the United Nations Police Division, New York, U.S.A. Prior to working for the United Nations, Gwen Boniface was appointed as Deputy Chief Inspector of the Garda Síochána Inspectorate in July, 2006.

Gwen was Police Commissioner of the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) where she gained wide experience in operational, policy and management positions. As Police Commissioner, she led the (OPP) through significant restructuring and change management. Gwen served as Regional Commander in Western Ontario where she managed the integration of four police districts into a single regional structure. She was invested into the Order of Ontario for her work with the First Nations communities. Gwen served as a Commissioner on the Law Commission of Canada.

Gwen is a graduate of York University and a law graduate of Osgoode Hall. She was called to the Ontario Bar in 1990 and she also holds an honours diploma in Law Enforcement.

Presentation Topic:

Mandates and political pressures have required many police departments to hire woman police officers; some departments see this as obligatory. These female officers are too often not utilized to their fullest potential. Experience and research indicate that women in leadership and decision-making roles are essential to maintaining stability, prosperity, peace and security throughout the world. Women make profound contributions in these areas; yet, females still represent only a small percent of police forces worldwide. Several nations have undertaken police reform initiatives, which include examining, gender roles, social barriers, training police leadership, and assessing internal police culture. By effectively highlighting the importance of inclusion and mainstreaming women into all areas of police service the departments, the presence of women police can strengthen reforming police forces and have significant impact on the police services.

Colonel (Retired) Linda Mayberry will be the facilitator for a Leadership Panel - Diversifying and Mainstreaming Female Police Officers.

Panel Members:

Gwen Boniface, Transnations Organized Crime Expert, United Nations. Police Division, New York, U.S.A.; former Commissioner Ontario Provincial Police.

Ms. M. Brooke Darby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of State, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs.

Sanja Sumonja, Inspector for the Ministry of Interior Republic of Srpska Bosnia and Herzegovina

Ellison E. Greenslade, Police Commissioner, Royal Bahamas Police Force, Nassau, Bahamas

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Dave Chubbs

Sergeant Chubbs is a member of the RCMP since 1991. He has been involved in Undercover Operations since 1999, and has worked on a full time Undercover Unit in British Columbia and was the Undercover Coordinator for the province of Nova Scotia. He has taught at the National Level on the Organized Crime, Major Crime and the Operational Undercover Course and is considered a Subject Matter Expert on Undercover Operations. He is currently the NCO i/c of the Guns and Gangs Unit in Halifax.

Presentation Topic:

Sergeant Stephen MacQueen and Sergeant Dave Chubbs

Both Sergeant(s) MacQueen and Chubbs are members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Together they will present an overview of the Paula Gallant Investigation. This historical Homicide Investigation, dating back to December 2005, led to laying first-degree murder charges, against the victim’s husband and conclusion of that file received national media attention. They will provide information about this tragic case and how the RCMP used the Major Crime Undercover technique to solve this murder and obtain a conviction.

Sergeant MacQueen is an 11 year member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and is currently the NCO in charge of the Criminal Intelligence Sections in Nova Scotia. He will draw on his experience to conduct a presentation on Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs - The Canadian Overview of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gang situation in Canada. This session will include the structure, characteristics, trends, and law enforcement successes in this area.

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Steve Conohan

Sgt. Steve Conohan is a twenty year member of the RCMP and currently NCO I/C of B Division Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Section. He has an extensive drug background but also a background in the area of intellectual property and customs and excise. He is a court recognized expert in a multitude of drugs as well as illicit drug proceeds. He has received a CO’s commendation, two RNC Chief of Police Commendations for his work in Drug Enforcement. Sgt. Conohan has also been recognized by the Provincial Minister of Health and the Commanding Officer with Certificates of Appreciation for his efforts in the area of Drug Prevention and Awareness Initiatives. He has completed three joint RCMP/ United Nations international training missions. 2007 Pakistan/Afghanistan, 2008 Bogota, Colombia, and 2009 in Nassau, Bahamas. He has instructed police officers and chemists from sixteen countries around the world about Clandestine Drug Laboratories and the international smuggling of precursor chemicals. He has been an instructor at the Canadian Police College in Ottawa in the area of Clandestine Drug Labs and a curriculum advisor for the Ontario Police College on the same topic. He has been lead instructor for the Atlantic Region Clandestine Lab Response Team since 2004 and frequently lectures on drug related matters.

Presentation Topic:

RCMP "B Division", St. John's Newfoundland and Labrador. Sgt Conohan will be conducting a presentation on Clandestine Laboratories and Illegal Synthetics. This will be an interactive display/workshop where candidates will get to see first hand what some of these illegal labs look like from the inside and how we can mitigate the dangers associated with them. Pre-raid planning and surreptitious entries will also be briefly touched on in this session.

^ Top of Page

Superintendent Shirley Cuillierrier

Superintendent Shirley Cuillierrier

Director of Immigration and Passport, Federal and International Operations, RCMP National Headquarters, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Supt. Cuillierrier is a First Nations Mohawk from Kanesatake, Quebec. A member of the RCMP for 29 years, she has spent 15 years working in Atlantic Canada & national headquarters in a variety of operational & administrative police duties. Commissioned in 2004, her past positions include Officer in Charge of National Aboriginal Policing Services, Director of National Learning Programs, National Co-ordinator of Aboriginal Protests and Director of Strategic Services for Federal & International Policing Operations. In 2008, she was seconded to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, as the Director of Emergency Mangement, Gatineau, Quebec. Recognition for her achievements include: First Canadian recipient of the “Indian Country Law Enforcement Officer of the Year 2007” awarded by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, a Commissioner’s Commendation for her work in the Performance Management Unit, a Commanding Officer’s Commendation for outstanding service in Inuit recruiting in northern Canada & the Queen’s Silver Jubilee Medal.

Presentation Topic:

UN Women in Peace Keepers Panel - High level women police leaders from United Nations international peace operations and beyond discuss leadership techniques, experiences, lessons learned and advice on what it takes to manage complex mandates on policing post-conflict societies. The panel will discuss the importance of partnerships and how to make them work. The session will be a roundtable with an interactive questions and answers format.

Confirmed Members of this Panel are:

Commissioner Ann-Marie Orler, Police Adviser to the United Nations Secretary-General and Director of the Police Division, Office of Rule of Law and Security Institutions, Department of Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations (Sweden)

Assistant Inspector General Kadi Facondo, Donor Coordinator, United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID)

Detective Chief Superintendent, Janice McClean, Senior Police Adviser, United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Sierra Leone (United Kingdom)

Superintendent Shirley Cuillierrier, Director of Immigration and Passport Section, Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Ms. Brooke Darby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, U.S. Department of State

^ Top of Page

Ms. M. Brooke Darby

Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of State, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs.

Ms. Darby became a Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for INL in March 2011, following an 18-month assignment as Chief of Staff to the Director General of the Foreign Service.

A career member of the Civil Service, Ms. Darby has a long prior record of service in INL from 1995-2009. During this period, she was responsible for developing and managing peacekeeping and criminal justice capacity building programs in the Balkans, Afghanistan, Africa, and, most recently, Iraq. She also served as director of the Narcotics Affairs Section at the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan from 2002-2005.

Before joining the State Department, Ms. Darby served on the National Security Council staff.

She graduated with honors from Mount Holyoke College (B.A.) and Georgetown University Law Center (J.D.).

She is married and has two grown stepdaughters, as well as two dogs and a cat acquired on her tour in Pakistan.

Presentation Topic:

As Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, Ms. Brooke Darby will bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to the two high Level panels that she is participating in at this years Conference.

The United Nations Women in Police Peacekeeepers Panel scheduled for Wednesday, September 12th.

Diversifying and Mainstreaming Female Police Officers - Leadership Panel scheduled for Thursday, September 13th.

^ Top of Page

Constable Kenneth M. Duff

Constable Kenneth M. Duff

Ken has been a member of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (RNC) for over 29 years. He is a graduate of the Atlantic Police Academy, and has received specialized training in financial crime investigations from the Atlantic Police Academy, the RCMP Depot in Regina, Saskatchewan and the Canadian Police College.

Ken has spent 23 years assigned to RNC's Criminal Investigation Division including the last 18 years with the Economic Crime Unit (ECU). During his time with the ECU Ken has investigated a variety of financial crimes including Occupational Fraud, Embezzlement, Identity Theft, White Collar Crime, Mortgage Fraud, Computer/Internet Fraud, Payment Card Fraud, Counterfeit Money, Telemarketing Fraud, Insurance Fraud, Ponzi Schemes, Bribery/Kickback, Public Corruption, Frauds on Government, Forgery, Money Laundering and Proceeds of Crime.

Presentation Topic:

Ken will co-present with Sgt. Shawn O'Reilly and will discuss some of the more popular types of Scams circulating on the Internet, how they are perpetrated and how investigators can proceed.

^ Top of Page

Michael Duncan

Michael Duncan joined the Bank of Canada in 2003 as a Senior Analyst in the Bank Note Communication and Compliance Program. In 2008, he was appointed Assistant Director (Compliance). Based at the Bank’s Head Office in Ottawa, Michael works with law enforcement agencies and the judiciary to support their efforts to investigate counterfeit offences and prosecute offenders.

Michael was born in Fredericton, New Brunswick. He successfully completed a special full-time program of studies in commerce and law at the University of British Columbia in 1981.

Before joining the Bank, Michael had been a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police since 1974. He served at various locations in British Columbia and Ontario and retired as a Staff Sergeant. Much of his service was devoted to the investigation of commercial crime and he was the RCMP’s National Counterfeit Coordinator for 10 years. During that period, Michael also served on executive boards, including Interpol’s Advisory Group on a Universal Classification System for Counterfeits, and he was Canada’s representative on several international working groups, including the G-8 Working Group on International Organized Payment Card Crime.

Michael enjoys writing and was recently named to the Board of Trustees for the RCMP Quarterly magazine and is also on its Editorial Management Board.

Presentation Topic:

Michael Duncan, Assistant Director, Compliance and Monique LeBlanc, Sr Regional Representative (Currency) Atlantic Canada - Bank of Canada

Together they will conduct a presentation on The Bank of Canada & Police: How a Successful Partnership Supports Confidence in Canada's Currency.

Few other areas of crime have seen such a dramatic reduction as currency counterfeiting in Canada. A 90 per cent reduction in counterfeit notes since 2004 has been the result of a solid partnership between the Bank of Canada and the Canadian law enforcement community in which each partner has functioned from a position of strength: the Bank has designed new bank notes that are hard to counterfeit; the Bank and the police have collaborated on cash handler education; and the police have been very aggressive in enforcement efforts. This presentation examines the partnership and how it continues to bear fruit at all levels.

^ Top of Page

Malin Enstrom

Crime Analyst with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, Malin Enstrom will speak on honour killings in developed countries. This talk will focus on immigrant cultures that are based on traditional customs and patriarchal structures from which honour killings originate. Her research has studied how honour-related violence has spread globally and how traditional patriarchal patterns are supported and perpetuated in host countries. In addition, this talk will address how the host countries have responded to this phenomena.

^ Top of Page

Kadi K. Fakondo

Kadi K. Fakondo

Ms. Kadi K. Fakondo is an Assistant Inspector General (AIG) from the Sierra Leone Police (SLP) currently serving in the United Nations African Union Hybrid Mission in Darfur (UNAMID). During the restructuring of her force she was part of the team that conducted the review of then Domestic Violence Unit (DVU) which was later transformed to the Family Support Unit (FSU) in the Sierra Leone Police. This unit specializes in the investigation of Sexual and Gender Based Violence (SGBV).

She has worked in several capacities in the Sierra Leone Police holding senior positions which include, Head of Support Services, Head of Professional Standards, AIG Crime Services, AIG Training and Head of Peacekeeping.

As a consultant to UNICEF Liberia, she trained officers of the Liberia National Police (LNP) in the investigation of SGBV which led to the establishment of the Women and Children Protection Section (WCPS).

Ms. Fakondo has attended several national and international courses on gender and has presented papers both nationally and internationally. They include “Gender and Peacekeeping” and “Breaking Barriers”. In 2008, she championed the team from the Sierra Leone Police in drafting two important policies on “Gender Mainstreaming” and Sexual Abuse and Harassment.

She has served on several committees which looked at Security System Transformation in Sierra Leone and Gender and Security Sector Reform. For two years she held the position of National Chair of the Task Force for the Justice Sector Development Program (JSDP) addressing issues of reform within the security sector institutions in Sierra Leone.

In October 2009 she was offered an appointment in UNAMID, Darfur where she currently holds the position of Donor Coordinator and Gender Focal Point for the UNAMID Police.

Ms. Fakondo holds a Teacher’s Certificate, an Associate Degree in Law Enforcement and a Master’s Degree in Gender Studies.

Presentation Topic:

UN Women in Peace Keepers Panel - High level women police leaders from United Nations international peace operations and beyond discuss leadership techniques, experiences, lessons learned and advice on what it takes to manage complex mandates on policing post-conflict societies. The panel will discuss the importance of partnerships and how to make them work. The session will be a roundtable with an interactive questions and answers format.

Confirmed Members of this Panel are:

Commissioner Ann-Marie Orler, Police Adviser to the United Nations Secretary-General and Director of the Police Division, Office of Rule of Law and Security Institutions, Department of Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations (Sweden)

Assistant Inspector General Kadi Facondo, Donor Coordinator, United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID)

Detective Chief Superintendent, Janice McClean, Senior Police Adviser, United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Sierra Leone (United Kingdom)

Superintendent Shirley Cuillierrier, Director of Immigration and Passport Section, Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Ms. Brooke Darby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, U.S. Department of State

^ Top of Page

Staff Sergeant Julie Faucher

RCMP, Staff Sergeant Julie Faucher

Staff Sergeant Julie Faucher has been with the RCMP for 30 years, working in Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia between stints overseas. She has worked in a wide variety of areas such as patrol, drug enforcement, intelligence, border integrity and protection. She was deployed on several occasions to work overseas on international drug investigations (Spain) and protection (Peru).

S/Sgt. Faucher was an early adopter of international peace missions, deploying on the RCMPs second peace mission in 1992 to the United Nations Protection Force in the Former Yugoslavia. She has since served on three other missions: Ivory Coast in 2005-06, East Timor in 2001-02 and Guatemala from 1997-1999. She occupied a variety of positions including trainer, station commander and human rights investigator and has had the pleasure of working with police officers from around the world.

Having worked in the RCMPs International Peace Operations Branch for nearly a decade, she has developed an in-depth knowledge of international police deployments to peace operations, with a specialization in gender issues. In fact, Julie worked with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade to develop the RCMPs contribution to Canadas Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security.

Staff Sgt. Faucher has presented at or attended various international fora: she was a civilian police subject-matter expert at the Pearson Peacekeeping Centres NATO training exercise in Istanbul, Turkey; presented at the pre-deployment training for South African police officers deploying to Sudan, in Pretoria; presented at the Dakar pre-deployment training for West African police deploying to The DR Congo. In addition, she has spoken at a variety of police womens events, such as Laval University and, most recently at the Womens World Conference in Ottawa.

She is fluent in French, English and Spanish and is presently learning Arabic.

Presentation Topic:

RCMP, Staff Sergeant Julie Faucher, Toronto Police Service, Cst. Marie-Josée Fournier, and Calgary Police Service, Sgt. Clare Smart

Together they will conduct a presentation on "A Police Woman’s Place Is in Mission: Making a Difference for Women in Some of the World’s Most Challenging Places." This workshop will aim to provide police women with an understanding of the tremendous development opportunities available through deployments to international peace operations, as well as the chance to make a very real and concrete difference in the lives of people who live in failed and fragile states. It will also illustrate how police women training and mentoring other police women in these countries act as critical role models not only for those they mentor, but also for the women, children and men in the population.

^ Top of Page

Deputy Chief Leanne Fitch

Deputy Chief Leanne Fitch

Leanne Fitch was appointed to the position of Deputy Chief of the Fredericton Police Force on September 19, 2005, making her the first female to reach this rank in Atlantic Canada. Leanne graduated from UNB with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1985 and graduated from the Ontario Police College in 1986 as a member of the Toronto Police Service. Leanne returned home to work with the Fredericton Police Force and while working full time, she completed a Masters of Arts degree from UNB in 1995 with the focus of her graduate studies placed on the sociology of policing, community policing and organizational change. Her master’s thesis was nominated for a Governor General’s Gold Medal award. She also taught part time as an Instructor in the Department of Criminology with St. Thomas University for 6 years. Leanne is a published author on topics including Community Policing, Organizational Change, Intimate Partner Violence and other police related topics and has presented on these issues locally, nationally and internationally. During her 27 years in policing Leanne has served in many functions ranging from patrol work on the front lines, specialty sections, supervision and administration. Leanne has been recognized by her province and federally for her work related to crime prevention. Leanne is a member of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police and New Brunswick Chiefs of Police where she is involved in various committees. She is the Regional coordinator for the International Association of Women Police representing the four Atlantic Provinces, Ontario and Quebec and Conference advisor for the International conference to be held in Newfoundland in 2012. She was named officer of the year for the Atlantic Women in Law Enforcement and International Women in Law Enforcement in 2002 and 2003 respectively.

Presentation Topic:

IAWP President Jane Townsley, Deputy Chief Leanne Fitch, and Deputy Commissioner Amena Begum

Together, they will conduct a First-Time Attendees Workshop which will provide an overview of the conference training and activities. You will be introduced to the IAWP president Jane Townsley, who will discuss the history, mission, and goals of the IAWP and the 2012 conference. Hear tips to take advantage of all opportunities that IAWP has to offer. Learn why some consider the networking opportunities at the conference, and through the organization, to be among one of the most important opportunities for women working in law enforcement. Hear the personal experience of how IAWP made a change in the professional and personal life of one of its members. THIS SESSION IS SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR FIRST TIME ATTENDEES ONLY.

^ Top of Page

Constable Marie-Josee Fournier

Toronto Police Service, Constable Marie-Josee Fournier

Toronto Police Constable Marie-Josee Fournier has been a police officer for 17 years, starting in Quebec then transferring to the Toronto Police Service in 2005.

She has worked in a wide variety of positions within policing, including patrol, criminal investigations, community response unit and scenes of crime officer, to name a few. In addition to teaching police foundations at a Toronto college and coaching new officers, Marie-Josee is an avid learner, having taken many courses and seminars over the years to develop her policing knowledge and skills.

In November 2009, Cst. Fournier embarked on a whole new chapter of her career when she served on a peace operation in Afghanistan for nine months. She was among the first Canadian civilian police women to serve in Afghanistan through the RCMP's International Peace Operations Branch.

While in Afghanistan working as a trainer and mentor with the European Union Police Mission, she drew heavily on her teaching and coaching background, advising the Ministry of the Interior (MoI) on initiatives to improve the conditions for women and children in detenion centres and prisons.

What she saw there moved her to start a major fundraising campaign with her Toronto Police colleagues to gather toys, clothes, school supplies and sporting goods for the women and children she met.

Along with three colleagues, Montreal Police Cst. Annie Lacroix, RCMP Cpl. Karen Holowaychuk and Norwegian Police Officer Jane Bakken, she helped to organize a training course for female Afghan National Police officers in Kandahar. The training covered important policing basics, from use of force and first aid to how to use their police baton, pepper spray and 9 mm pistol.

In the fall of 2010, Cst. Fournier was invited by the RCMP to join Assistant Commissioner Graham Muir, the former Canadian Police Commander in Afghanistan, to speak to the House of Commons Senate Committee about her experiences in Afghanistan and the importance of Canadian and international police contributions to the development of a professional and independent Afghan National Police.

Cst. Fournier now works with the Toronto Police's Major Crimes Unit.

Presentation Topic:

RCMP, Staff Sergeant Julie Faucher, Toronto Police Service, Cst. Marie-Josée Fournier, and Calgary Police Service, Sgt. Clare Smart

Together they will conduct a presentation on "A Police Woman’s Place Is in Mission: Making a Difference for Women in Some of the World’s Most Challenging Places." This workshop will aim to provide police women with an understanding of the tremendous development opportunities available through deployments to international peace operations, as well as the chance to make a very real and concrete difference in the lives of people who live in failed and fragile states. It will also illustrate how police women training and mentoring other police women in these countries act as critical role models not only for those they mentor, but also for the women, children and men in the population.

^ Top of Page

Dr. Kevin Gilmartin

Dr. Kevin Gilmartin

Dr. Gilmartin is a behavioral sciences and management consultant specializing in the law enforcement and public safety areas. He formerly spent twenty years in law enforcement in Tucson, Arizona. During his tenure, he supervised the Behavioral Sciences Unit and the Hostage Negotiations Team. He is a former recipient of the IACP-Parade Magazine National Police Officer Service Award for contributions during hostage negotiations. He presently maintains a consulting relationship with law enforcement agencies nationally in the U.S. and in Canada. He holds adjunct faculty positions with The University of Massachusetts Police Leadership Institute, and The Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas at Sam Houston State University. He is a guest instructor at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia and a faculty member of the FBI Law Enforcement Executive Development Institute (LEEDS, EDI and the National Executive Development Institute). He is retained by several Federal law enforcement agency critical incident response teams. He is a charter member of the IACP: Psychological Services Section and former vice-president of the Society of Police and Criminal Psychology. He holds a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from the University of Arizona. In addition to being the author of the book Emotional Survival for Law Enforcement, he is the author of numerous articles published by the Dept. of Justice, the IACP, and the FBI. He is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and resides in Portland, Oregon and Tucson, Arizona.

Presentation Topic:

Dr. Gilmartin is a Behavioral Scientist and management consultant specializing in the law enforcement and public safety areas. He formerly spent twenty years in law enforcement where he supervised a Behavioral Sciences Unit and the Hostage Negotiations Team. Dr. Gilmartin will speak on “Emotional Survival for Law Enforcement.”

^ Top of Page

Ellison E. Greenslade

Ellison E. Greenslade

Police Commissioner, Royal Bahamas Police Force, Nassau, Bahamas

Ellison Edroy Greenslade was appointed the sixth commissioner of police in an independent Bahamas on January 4, 2010. He served as the acting deputy commissioner of police starting in January 2009 after completing a one year secondment with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Canada. Born in Nassau, Bahamas, Commissioner Greenslade has an MBA degree from the University of Miam, graduating in 1997 with honors. He is currently a doctoral candidate in organizational management and leadership studies at the University of Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Commissioner Greenslade has received several honors throughout his career including The Queen's Police Medal (QPM) for distinguished police service and the Prime Minister's "Above and Beyond Award" from the Right Honorable Prime Minister, Hubert A. Ingraham. He is also the recipient of the Police Force's medals for meritorious service, long service, and good conduct. Commissioner Greenslade holds membership in a number of international organizations and was recently appointed to the Executive Committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. He is also the currently serving as the President of the Association of Caribbean Commissioners of Police (ACCP).

Presentation Topic:

Mandates and political pressures have required many police departments to hire woman police officers; some departments see this as obligatory. These female officers are too often not utilized to their fullest potential. Experience and research indicate that women in leadership and decision-making roles are essential to maintaining stability, prosperity, peace and security throughout the world. Women make profound contributions in these areas; yet, females still represent only a small percent of police forces worldwide. Several nations have undertaken police reform initiatives, which include examining, gender roles, social barriers, training police leadership, and assessing internal police culture. By effectively highlighting the importance of inclusion and mainstreaming women into all areas of police service the departments, the presence of women police can strengthen reforming police forces and have significant impact on the police services.

Colonel (Retired) Linda Mayberry will be the facilitator for a Leadership Panel - Diversifying and Mainstreaming Female Police Officers.

Panel Members:

Gwen Boniface, Transnations Organized Crime Expert, United Nations. Police Division, New York, U.S.A.; former Commissioner Ontario Provincial Police.

Ms. M. Brooke Darby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of State, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs.

Sanja Sumonja, Inspector for the Ministry of Interior Republic of Srpska Bosnia and Herzegovina

Ellison E. Greenslade, Police Commissioner, Royal Bahamas Police Force, Nassau, Bahamas

^ Top of Page

Anne Marie Hagan

Anne Marie Hagan

Anne Marie Hagan is a motivational speaker who tells an amazing true story that inspires hope, and invigorates the human spirit.

Born and raised in Kingman’s Cove, Newfoundland and Labrador, at the age of nineteen Anne Marie saw her father being murdered with an axe. Years later she met with her father’s killer and forgave him. Since then, she has been a strong advocate of restorative justice.

She travels extensively sharing her journey, wanting to make a difference in the lives of others. She has been showcased by numerous media outlets across Canada. Anne Marie was also profiled in the award-winning television documentary, Forgiveness: Stories For Our Time.

Anne Marie’s work has been recognized internationally. Her story is part of The Forgiveness Project; a UK-based charitable organization whose vision it is to build a better future by healing the wounds of the past.

Anne Marie’s book, Forgiven: Embracing the Man Who Murdered My Father is scheduled for release in 2012.

Anne Marie now resides in the community of Aquaforte, Newfoundland and Labrador.

Presentation Topic:

Ms. Hagan is a motivational speaker who tells and amazing story of forgiveness and justice. At the age of nineteen Anne Marie saw her father being murdered with an axe. Years later Ms. Hagan met with her father’s killer and forgave him. Since then, she has been a strong advocate of restorative justice.

^ Top of Page

Major Vanessa Hanrahan

Major Vanessa Hanrahan

Major Vanessa Hanrahan joined the Canadian Forces in 1994 as a member of the Communication Reserves in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Following the completion of her B.A. at Saint Mary’s University in 1999, she transferred into the regular force as a Military Police Officer. Major Hanrahan completed her Basic Military Police Officer’s Course in 1999 and was subsequently posted to the Canadian Forces Support Unit (Ottawa) Military Police Company where she held positions as the Assistant Provost Marshal Security and Assistant Provost Marshal Police.

In 2003 Major Hanrahan was given the position as the Officer Commanding 3 Area Support Group Military Police Company in Gagetown, NB. During her tenure, Major Hanrahan completed her first operational tour in 2004 where she deployed to Haiti as part of Operation HALO. Major Hanrahan remained in New Brunswick until 2006 when she was posted Ottawa as the Commanding Officer of Canadian National Investigation Service (CFNIS).

In 2007, Major Hanrahan received her promotion to her current rank and was subsequently posted in 2008 as the Executive Assistant to the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal. In August 2010, Major Hanrahan deployed to Afghanistan as the Commanding Officer of the Canadian Afghan Uniform Police Training Team; working to provide professional development to the Afghan National Police in the province of Kandahar. Upon return from deployment in August 2011, Major Hanrahan was appointed as the Commanding Officer for 2 Military Police Regiment and is responsible for the Canadian Army Military Police in Ontario.

Presentation Topic:

Major Vanessa Hanrahan will speak on The Role of the Canadian Military Police and Experiences Mentoring the Afghan National Police. This presentation will introduce participants to the role and responsibilities of the Canadian Military Police and their specialized units within. Between August 2010 until July 2011, Maj Hanrahan was deployed as part of a Canadian Mentor Team in support of the Afghan National Police Regional Training Centre in Kandahar Province Afghanistan. She will speak of the progress made and the challenges faced during this deployment.

^ Top of Page

Major Suzan Hajj Hobeiche

Major Suzan Hajj Hobeiche is the Chief of Technical Department, Counter Terrorism Unit, Juridical Police, and Head of the academic institution for the female cadets, with the Internal Security Forces, Lebanon. She is a graduate from the Lebanese University and holds a diploma in Engineering and a Master’s degree in Computer Science. Major Hobeiche was also the first woman to join the Internal Security Forces(ISF) in Lebanon.

While assigned to the Intelligence Department, Suzan was involved in the design of an ORACLE database and a secure network. She conducted and coordinated high tech investigations and operations within the framework of terrorism. In 2004, she transferred to the Telecommunication Department, where she worked on supervising “tetra” network. She also coordinated with the Ministry of Social Affairs regarding child pornography legislation. During that period, she also served as a National Security Officer for Interpol in Lebanon.

In 2005 Major Hobeiche was appointed as Chief of the Administrative Department at the Mobile Force Unit, and a year later, appointed as Coordinator for the evacuation of American citizens during the July 2006 war. In 2008, Major Hobeiche was promoted to Chief of Technical Department in the Counter Terrorism Unit where she worked on the design and programming of the ORACLE database as well as coordinating and conducting “high tech investigations” involving telephone interception and cybercrime intrusion.

In 2010, Major Hobeiche was elected Assistant Secretary to the first Female Recruitment Commission in the ISF and in December 2011, she was elected Chief of the training for the first 600 female trainees. This training will change the community perspective towards women and is judged as the most important step in this decade regarding women’s rights in Lebanon.

Major Suzan Hajj Hobeiche is an active speaker on gender issues and community policing in the ISF, where she worked adamantly for the recruitment of new female officers. To ensure women were fully integrated into Lebanon's police force she conceptualized the idea to set up a RED Police Bureau which would Mainstream Rights, Equality and Diversity standards while ensuring the police views and interests are accurately relayed to government and key stakeholders. This bureau would represent the member’s interests in matters of discipline, diversity, equality, health and safety, welfare, pensions, and claims. She is currently implementing this "RED Bureau" police project within the ISF structure.

Major Hobeiche has received numerous awards and commendations from: the Chief of the Counter Terrorism Unit, the Chief of the Intelligence Department, a Competence Award from the ISF, an award from the Minister of Interior, and a commendation from the Counter Terrorism Coordinator of the New South Wales Police (Australia), as well as a winner award from JSMT from United kingdom.

Presentation Topic:

Major Hobeiche will conduct a session on the Lebanese policewomen improvement and the "RED Police Bureau” project. This presentation will provide information on the recruitment and training of women in the Internal Security Forces. When the ISF advertised for women to join the ranks, they received over 11,000 applicants. So far, 6oo of them have been selected and have completed their training. Her presentation will cover their training in the academy where they demonstrated their skills which helped them to be assigned in their future tasks similar to men. Her presentation will also cover the "Red Police" action plan : "the objectives, the outputs, and the challenges, as well as providing information on the mission and the Proposal draft for the amendment of ISF’s law 17/90".

Madame Justice Lois Hoegg

Madam Justice Hoegg graduated from Acadia University with a Bachelor of Arts in 1977 and from the Weldon Law School of Dalhousie University with a Bachelor of Laws in 1982. She articled with the Department of Justice (Government of Newfoundland and Labrador) in St. Johns and after being admitted to the Bar in 1983, worked there as a Crown Attorney for several years. She subsequently spent four years as the Legal Director of the Law Society of Newfoundland and Labrador before joining Ches Crosbie Barristers in the private practice of law.

Justice Hoegg concentrated her private practice in civil litigation with an emphasis on personal injury law, administrative law, professional discipline and criminal law. In June 2000 she received her Queens Counsel designation. Among many professional accomplishments, Justice Hoegg was the Commissioner of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary Public Complaints Commission, Chair of the Canadian Bar Associations National Committee on Ethics and Professional Issues and a frequent Bar Admission Course lecturer. As well, Justice Hoegg has given much volunteer time and effort to the Canadian Bar Association and the Law Society of Newfoundland and Labrador, as well as several other professional and community organizations and educational institutions.

On June 1, 2007, Justice Hoegg was appointed a Judge of the Trial Division of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador. Three years later, she was appointed a Justice of the Court of Appeal. She is married to Chesley Crosbie, Q.C. and is the mother of Charlotte, Catherine and Rachel.

Presentation Topic:

Madame Justice Hoegg will be presenting on Leadership and Mentoring. She will offer her personal observations on the increased involvement of women in the justice system during the past 30 years.

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Myra James

Myra joined the Hamilton Police Service, Ontario Canada in 1988 and currently is a Crime Manager supervising several members of the Community Response Unit. During the past 24 years she has been assigned to general patrol, motorcycle officer, Breathalyzer technician, vice and drugs investigator, patrol sergeant, crowd management unit member, Crime Stoppers Coordinator, Sex Crimes Unit and Criminal Investigation Division. She is a charter executive member and Immediate Past President of the Ontario Women In Law Enforcement Executive which was established in 1997. Since 2000 she has also been on the Board of Directors of the International Association of Women Police and has attended their annual training conferences for the past 19 consecutive years. She is an advocate for equitable treatment of women in law enforcement. In 2005 she received the mentoring award from the Ontario Women In Law Enforcement and the IAWP. She was humbled to receive the Hamilton Woman of the Year award from the Status of Women Committee as well. For the past 17 years she has been a member of the Stoney Creek Rotary Club and recently accepted a director's position on the Hamilton Status of Women Committee.

On a personal note, Myra has been happily married to Rick for 31 years. They enjoy traveling internationally as well as riding their Harley Davidsons. Myra has a background full of unique experiences such as oatmeal wrestling, sky diving and her recent role as Assistant Transportation Venue Manager for the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. Additionally she enjoys woodworking, golfing and has played ice hockey for the past 35 years. She is always looking for new adventures to add to her inventory of life experiences.

Presentation Topic:

Hamilton Police Service (Ontario Women In Law Enforcement *Immediate Past President) will present on Developing a Female Law Enforcement Association * From Conversations to Commitment. Participants of this workshop will learn about successful practices of other affiliate executives who have been involved in the initial communications/vision, planning, preparing, and organizing a not for profit organization designed to promote and enhance the development of women in law enforcement. Common challenges to recruitment and retention of members will be discussed combined with potential strategies for membership growth. Examples of current IAWP affiliate initiatives which include web site overviews, professional development, scholarship criteria’s, establishment of advisory councils, and award programs will be offered. An explanation of vital executive roles will provide participants with the knowledge they require to identify individuals to accept the lead role for the establishment of an IAWP affiliate organization.

^ Top of Page

Inspector Gerry Kerr

Inspector Kerr is a member of the RCMP and is currently the District Officer responsible for Operations in V Division, Territory of Nunavut. She has 26 years policing experience and was heavily involved in teaching domestic violence, child abuse and sexual abuse investigation skills to police and child welfare workers since 1997 in Alberta, Manitoba and Nunavut. She has developed curriculum on these course since 1997 in these provinces. Insp. Kerr has operational and GIS policing experience in Alberta, Manitoba and Nunavut. Her GIS experience was in Fort McMurray working with exploited women and children while in the Sex Crimes Unit.

Presentation Topic:

District Officer for Operations in “V” Division, Territory of Nunavut. Insp. Kerr will speak on Victims’ Perspective, Human Trafficking Interview of Victims. The presentation will focus on interviews with six victims of human trafficking and various workers involved in the cases. The six victims were asked four basic questions and the most important was - If you had an opportunity to tell the police what they could do better what would you say?

^ Top of Page

Monique LeBlanc

Monique LeBlanc was appointed Senior Regional Representative (Currency) at the Bank's Regional Office for the Atlantic provinces in 2005. In this capacity, she ensures delivery of the Bank's currency education program and monitors developments related to currency and its security in the region. In co-operation with private sector partners, she is responsible for overseeing and monitoring the bank note distribution system. She also plays a major role in promoting the Bank and communicating its messages to a variety of external audiences.

Monique grew up in Margaree Forks, Nova Scotia. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1990 from St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, and a diploma in Actuarial Mathematics in 1991 from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Monique spent over 10 years in actuarial work at the Maritime Life Insurance Company in Halifax. She attained the designations of Fellow of the Society of Actuaries and Fellow of the Canadian Institute of Actuaries in 2002 after a lengthy program of self-directed study.

Presentation Topic:

Michael Duncan, Assistant Director, Compliance and Monique LeBlanc, Sr Regional Representative (Currency) Atlantic Canada - Bank of Canada

Together they will conduct a presentation on The Bank of Canada & Police: How a Successful Partnership Supports Confidence in Canada's Currency.

Few other areas of crime have seen such a dramatic reduction as currency counterfeiting in Canada. A 90 per cent reduction in counterfeit notes since 2004 has been the result of a solid partnership between the Bank of Canada and the Canadian law enforcement community in which each partner has functioned from a position of strength: the Bank has designed new bank notes that are hard to counterfeit; the Bank and the police have collaborated on cash handler education; and the police have been very aggressive in enforcement efforts. This presentation examines the partnership and how it continues to bear fruit at all levels.

^ Top of Page

Dr. Elliott Leyton

Canadian social-anthropologist, educator and author who is among the most widely consulted experts on serial homicide worldwide.

^ Top of Page

James Lockyer, LLB

James Lockyer obtained his LLB at the University of Nottingham in 1971 and is a member of the Bar in England. From 1972 until 1977, he was an Assistant Professor at the Law Faculties of McGill University and the University of Windsor. In 1977 he was called to the Ontario Bar and began to practice criminal law. He has been a criminal lawyer for 35 years. He has received four honourary doctorates from three Canadian universities and the Law Society of Upper Canada.

Mr. Lockyer is a founding director of the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted (AIDWYC), a Canada-wide organization that advocates for the wrongly convicted. In that capacity, he has been involved in several high profile wrongful conviction cases including those of David Milgaard, Guy Paul Morin and Steven Truscott.

Presentation Topic:

A Director of the Association in Defence of the Wrongfully Convicted and a criminal lawyer. Mr. Lockyer’s presentation title is “If you arrest and convict the wrong person, you leave the real culprit out there.” Mr. Lockyer is a founding director of the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted, a Canada-wide organization that advocates for the wrongly convicted. In that capacity, Mr. Lockyer has been involved in several high profile wrongful conviction cases including those of David Milgaard, Guy Paul Morin and Steven Truscott.

^ Top of Page

Dr. TA Loeffler

Dr. TA Loeffler

Dr. TA Loeffler brings 25 years of expertise leading people through significant life-changing experiences to every facet of her work. Her work and adventures have taken her to 38 different countries and all seven continents. TA is attempting to complete “The Seven Summits,” the highest peak on all seven continents and has only one left to complete: Mount Everest.

As a Professor of Outdoor Recreation at Memorial University of Newfoundland, TA has developed a reputation for excellence in experiential education because her students are more likely to be outside chasing icebergs than sitting in a classroom. TA inspires hope, possibility, and vision in those whose lives she touches. Over the past six years, TA has shared her message of “Big Dreams, Big Goals” with over 32,000 youth in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

TA believes that we all long for a balanced, engaged, and creative life that challenges us to be the best we can possibly be. She models this belief in her life on a daily basis and combines her broad range of skills to inspire all to create the life they truly want.

Using her vast collection of outdoor adventures to create metaphors that provide new ways to see and transform the inevitable obstacles of life, TA’s multimedia presentations inform, inspire, and motivate. As an award-winning filmmaker and speaker, TA understands the power of metaphor to initiate and sustain life and professional change.

TA has received international and national recognition for her innovative teaching and inspirational speaking.

In 2008, TA was awarded a prestigious 3M National Teaching Fellowship and named as the Minnesota State University “2008 Distinguished Alumnus” in the Humanitarian category.
In 2007, TA received the Karl Rhonke Creativity Award from the Association of Experiential Education.

In 2006, The Globe and Mail named TA, “A Class Act” and she received the Association of Atlantic Universities Distinguished Teaching Award. As well, the Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women in Sport named TA to their 2006 Top Twenty Most Influential Women in Canadian Sport and Physical Activity List. Additionally, TA received the Memorial University Presidents Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2005 and the Association for Experiential Education named TA the Outstanding Experiential Teacher of the Year in 1999.

TA is a talented athlete. TA uses strength training, running, biking, yoga, cycling and step aerobics to prepare for her expeditions. She has a passion for hockey and has played every position on the ice including goaltender. TA has coached several championship winning hockey teams and has officiated at the national championship level. Through her experience in both sports and outdoor adventure, TA intimately appreciates teamwork and knows how to bring teams together to accomplish their goals and fulfill their greatest potential.

Presentation Topic:

Dr. TA Loeffler brings 25 years of expertise leading people through significant life-changing experiences to every facet of her work. Her work and adventures have taken her to 38 different countries and all seven continents. TA is attempting to complete The Seven Summits, the highest peak on all seven continents and has only one left to complete: Mount Everest. In her presentation, TA will invite you to discover your own Everest as well as entertain and inspire with a multi-media presentation of the lessons learned from training for, reaching, and climbing the worlds highest mountains.

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Stephen MacQueen

Sgt Stephen MacQueen has been a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police since 2001. He is currently in charge of the Criminal Intelligence Sections in Nova Scotia and specializes in Undercover Operations and Organized Crime investigations. He has taught at the National level on both the Operational Undercover and Organized Crime Expert Witness Courses. Additionally, he has been declared by the courts as an expert witness in relation to Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs and Organized Crime.

Presentation Topic:

Sergeant Stephen MacQueen and Sergeant Dave Chubbs

Both Sergeant(s) MacQueen and Chubbs are members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Together they will present an overview of the Paula Gallant Investigation. This historical Homicide Investigation, dating back to December 2005, led to laying first-degree murder charges, against the victim’s husband and conclusion of that file received national media attention. They will provide information about this tragic case and how the RCMP used the Major Crime Undercover technique to solve this murder and obtain a conviction.

Sergeant MacQueen is an 11 year member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and is currently the NCO in charge of the Criminal Intelligence Sections in Nova Scotia. He will draw on his experience to conduct a presentation on Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs - The Canadian Overview of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gang situation in Canada. This session will include the structure, characteristics, trends, and law enforcement successes in this area.

^ Top of Page

Colonel Linda Mayberry

Colonel Linda Mayberry, (Retired), is currently engaged in international police work as a senior police advisor to the United States Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL/CAP). The former Deputy Commissioner of the Kentucky State Police(US) has served on a number of state, national, and international boards and committees. Ms. Mayberry is committed to promoting the role of women in law enforcement and is founder of the Kentucky Women in Law Enforcement Network, co-chair of the International Association of Women Police International Scholarship Committee, executive board member of the International Managers of Police Academy and College Training Section of IACP, and an Expert Panel Member to the United Nations for Increasing Women in Peacekeeping Operations.

Presentation Topic:

Mandates and political pressures have required many police departments to hire woman police officers; some departments see this as obligatory. These female officers are too often not utilized to their fullest potential. Experience and research indicate that women in leadership and decision-making roles are essential to maintaining stability, prosperity, peace and security throughout the world. Women make profound contributions in these areas; yet, females still represent only a small percent of police forces worldwide. Several nations have undertaken police reform initiatives, which include examining, gender roles, social barriers, training police leadership, and assessing internal police culture. By effectively highlighting the importance of inclusion and mainstreaming women into all areas of police service the departments, the presence of women police can strengthen reforming police forces and have significant impact on the police services.

Colonel (Retired) Linda Mayberry will be the facilitator for a Leadership Panel - Diversifying and Mainstreaming Female Police Officers.

Panel Members:

Gwen Boniface, Transnations Organized Crime Expert, United Nations. Police Division, New York, U.S.A.; former Commissioner Ontario Provincial Police.

Ms. M. Brooke Darby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of State, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs.

Sanja Sumonja, Inspector for the Ministry of Interior Republic of Srpska Bosnia and Herzegovina

Ellison E. Greenslade, Police Commissioner, Royal Bahamas Police Force, Nassau, Bahamas

^ Top of Page

Detective Chief Superintendent Janice McClean

Detective Chief Superintendent Janice McClean

Senior Police Adviser, United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Sierra Leone (United Kingdom)

Detective Chief Superintendent Janice McClean has 30 years serving in the Metropolitan Police in London, UK. She started as a Police Constable walking the beat like all our officers do. She has experience in both uniform and CID, Public Order, mainly Football matches and large public demonstrations such as Notting Hill Carnival and May Day, Hostage and Crisis Intervention negotiator, Borough Crime Command including sexual offence investigation teams, robbery and burglary squads, undercover drugs operations, community support teams tackling vulnerable victims of crime, and laterally developed pan London teams in Proceeds of Crime-taking the cash of bad guys. Ran the internal Police Inspectorate.

She was selected as UK Contingent Commander and Head of War Crimes Unit, in the first EU Mission in Bosnia and in Lebanon in the UN International Independent Investigation Commission into the Assassination of ex-Prime Minister Rafik Hariri. First UK cop sent by the UK when the UK rejoined the UN as a PCC last year. Only female CBRN (Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear) Incident silver commander for many years in my Force. Part of the team that released safely a hostage from the longest running London siege in Hackney.

Presentation Topic:

UN Women in Peace Keepers Panel - High level women police leaders from United Nations international peace operations and beyond discuss leadership techniques, experiences, lessons learned and advice on what it takes to manage complex mandates on policing post-conflict societies. The panel will discuss the importance of partnerships and how to make them work. The session will be a roundtable with an interactive questions and answers format.

Confirmed Members of this Panel are:

Commissioner Ann-Marie Orler, Police Adviser to the United Nations Secretary-General and Director of the Police Division, Office of Rule of Law and Security Institutions, Department of Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations (Sweden)

Assistant Inspector General Kadi Facondo, Donor Coordinator, United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID)

Detective Chief Superintendent, Janice McClean, Senior Police Adviser, United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Sierra Leone (United Kingdom)

Superintendent Shirley Cuillierrier, Director of Immigration and Passport Section, Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Ms. Brooke Darby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, U.S. Department of State

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Daphne McFee

Sergeant Daphne McFee

Daphne McFee is a 24 year member with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and has received her distinguished service medal. Prior to joining the Force, she was an employee with the Royal Bank of Canada. She has been involved in various duties ranging from general duty policing, protective duties, including VIP protection and investigative duties and threat assessment within National Security, including special project management resulting from post 9/11 investigations.

In 1990, Daphne was one of the first originally trained members of the RCMP Emergency Medical Response Team, who were acting as Tactical Medics, having received advance pre-hospital care training in support of high risk Tactical Troop and Emergency Response Team deployments, which is now a national standard. Sgt. McFee is currently working in Professional Standards as a National Policy Advisor. She has also been trained as a forensic interviewer and has specialized in Scientific Content Analysis (SCAN) having been certified at the advanced level. She has a certificate from Cornell University in Project Leadership.

Daphne has taken several specialized communication courses over the years however a Speech Craft course in 2009 introduced her to the world and advantages of public speaking. She was one of the original members in the formation of the RCMP Professional Developmental Toastmasters Group in the new Ottawa RCMP Headquarters. She has served as treasurer, the VP of Education and Training, and has recently taken on the role as President of the club. Her skills advanced her to place second in her division for the Toastmasters International Speech contest, in April 2012.

Daphne has continued to develop her skills and promote the benefits of effective communication and public speaking to others, especially within the RCMP. As VP of Education for her Toastmasters Club, she arranged regular training sessions for Toastmasters as well as her fellow RCMP employees. She succeeded in obtaining her Competent Communication and Competent Leadership Certificates from Toastmasters and is working towards achieving advanced levels of public speaking with Toastmasters. She is a strong believer that all leaders within the police world should set higher standards regarding effective communication and public speaking.

Daphne is married, with 4 children. Her primary joy is spending time with her husband, Paul, a retired RCMP member, and her family. She also enjoys the outdoors, yoga, swimming, reading and crosswords……and of course – public speaking!

Presentation Topic:

Sergeant Daphne McFee will conduct a presentation titled "Effective Communications within the Career Police Environment". This Presentation is an eye-opener to the future leadership candidate. - it will expand your horizons to consider how the Toastmaster professional development program will increase personal communication and Leadership skills and career opportunities. It will expand inter-personal skills, and enhance your standing with the Officer ranks at all levels. The Toastmaster program has been introduced successfully across Canada within National and Regional forces to improve leadership images and to help increase community relationships and partnerships.

In this professional presentation, attendees are introduced to the benefits that link Toastmasters International to the career of a Police Officer. The Presentation will focus on 3 distinct areas:

  1. Why good Communication skills are essential,
  2. Specific types of presentation techniques and/or communication methods / formats; and
  3. How You Speak (to ensure effective communication).

Custom segments will be introduced specific to the Canadian Police environment. The format will include a Q&A session (at the end) to improve understanding and to provide follow-up information for attendees. The Presentation is engaging, informative, persuasive and delivered with the poise of the Toastmaster Brand.

^ Top of Page

Detective Sergeant Dorothy McPhail

Dorothy McPhail has served in the New Zealand Police for 27 years and has been a CIB member for 24 years. She is currently a Detective Sergeant supervising a Volume Crime Control Unit. She worked on Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) for several months after the Christchurch earthquakes in New Zealand and will draw on this experience as the topic for her presentation.

Presentation Topic:

New Zealand Police, Christchurch, New Zealand. D/Sgt. McPhail has served in the New Zealand Police force for 27 years and is presently supervising a Volume Crime Control Unit. D/Sgt. McPhail's presentation “When a City Falls - The police response to the Christchurch Earthquakes” will focus on the police response and rebuilding after such a tragic event that paralyzed the city.

^ Top of Page

Deputy Chief Jennifer Morrison

Deputy Chief Jennifer Morrison

Jennifer Morrison currently serves as Deputy Chief of the Burlington (VT) Police Department. She oversees all support services including investigations, communications, records, parking enforcement, facilities and administration. Prior to being promoted in 2012, she was a Lieutenant for eight years, spending six years in the patrol division and the last two as the Executive Officer. Her duties in this role included special projects, policy development, grants, supervision of special units and more. In addition, she supervised the domestic violence victim-advocates, Parallel Justice and the Volunteers in Policing team.

Prior to being promoted to lieutenant in January 2004, Morrison was the Director of the Chittenden Unit for Special Investigations which is a countywide task force that investigates sex crimes and serious child abuse cases. During her career she has had an array of assignments including serving as a patrol sergeant, detective sergeant, accreditation manager, grant writer, and patrol officer.

A graduate of The George Washington University with a B.A. in Journalism & Criminal Justice, Lieutenant Morrison received an M.A. in Leadership Studies from Norwich University in 2002. Lieutenant Morrison is a graduate of the FBI National Academy where she was recognized as a sectional leader. She is an instructor of Leadership in Police Organizations for the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

Lieutenant Morrison lives with her husband and two teenage daughters in the Lake Champlain Islands. During her free time she teaches undergraduate courses at Champlain College and Roger Williams University and coaches youth soccer.

Presentation Topic:

Deputy Chief Jennifer Morrison of the Burlington, Vermont Police Department together with Director Cecelia Rosser and Ms. Jennifer Porter of the IACP, will conduct a presentation on "Developing Current and Future Leaders in Your Department"

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) has worked with over 200 local, state and federal law enforcement departments in the U.S., Canada, Eastern Europe and the Middle East to develop the leaders within their organizations. Based on research on behavioral science theories that was originally developed by personnel at the West Point Military Academy and later modified for the law enforcement environment, students are taught key strategies for leading and motivating first individuals, then groups and organizations. Successful strategies for leading change are also highlighted. These strategies, which also focus on dispersed leadership styles, can be employed on both a professional and personal level. In addition to teaching some of the key strategies, IACP will explain how it works with departments to deliver the program locally, and to develop their staff and instructors so the program can be sustained locally. In addition, they learn to share best practices with other organizations worldwide employing the strategies in their professional development and promotional testing processes.

^ Top of Page

Cst. Thomas Nairne

Cst. Nairne, a member of the of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, is currently attached to the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) .The NCECC conducts child exploitation investigations on a National and International level. It is comprised of several sections, which include but is not limited to Operations, Strategic and Ops support, Research and Development. Included in the Operations section is the Victim Identification Section. Within this section regular and civilian members work with various police agencies around the world helping to identify and rescue children. There is a Victim Identification lab that is mobile.

Presentation Topic:

Presentation of the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) Victim Identification Lab:

Together, Cst. Nairne and Cst. Amber Smith will have the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) Victim Identification Lab set up for viewing.

Officially launched in June 2009, the NCECC victim identification lab is a web-based application that allows registered users to view sanitized child sexual exploitation images from unsolved international investigations. Once registered, users enter the system and can scroll over the icons to access the category of their choice. The user can add information/comments that may enhance the investigation to any of the files. The underlying premise of the VI lab is that the more investigator eyes that are on an image, the more likely it is the location, artifacts, and/or victim depicted will be identified. This is a clear example of applying a global law enforcement response strategy to address border less crimes.

^ Top of Page

Detective Inspector Chris Nicholas

Chris Nicholas is a Detective Inspector with the Ontario Provincial Police, working as a Major Case Manager in their Criminal Investigation Branch.

With a career in policing for the past 23 years, Chris has worked in the Westport and Arnprior detachments performing general law enforcement duties. He progressed through the organization working in Intelligence, Proceeds of Crime and Drug Enforcement Section, where he spent five years as an undercover operator.

Chris was promoted to Detective Sergeant then Detective Staff Sergeant, working within the Eastern Region Crime Unit as a Criminal Operations Supervisor.

Throughout his career, Chris focused on Major Cases. He has been involved in excess of 140 homicide investigations, working in various roles from the Under Cover Operator, Lead Investigator, Supervisor and Major Case Manager.

Chris was selected and performed the duties of the Crime Management Coordinator for the 2007 North American Leaders Summit involving the Presidential visits from the United States and Mexico, as well as the 2010 G8 Summit in Huntsville Ontario.

Presentation Topic:

Criminal Investigation Branch of the Ontario Provincial Police. Detective Inspector Nicholas will present an overview of the investigation of David Russell Williams, a convicted murderer, rapist, and former Colonel in the Canadian Forces.

^ Top of Page

Staff Sergeant George F.H. Noseworthy M.O.M (Ret'd)

S/Sgt. Noseworthy was born and raised in St. John's NL. On the 25th of August, 1975, he joined the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and served for almost 36 years retiring on the 10th of August, 2011.

S/Sgt. Noseworthy served all his time in the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador with the exception of his last year of service, where he served as a seconded member to the European Union Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo.

During his whole career, S/Sgt. Noseworthy worked totally in operational positions. As District Commander of the Northern Peninsula District, he encompassed Community Policing in all aspects of his and other members daily work.

The District formed strong partnerships in their communities and the district was successful in addressing many issued raised within the communities they police. It was this knowledge that he brought to Kosovo, writing and organizing a plan that was implemented in the North of Kosovo in an effort to establish solid community policing practices in the Northern Communities.

Presentation Topic:

S/Sgt. Noseworthy will deliver a presentation on Community Policing - Planning and Implementation.

This presentation will make commanders aware of the necessity to involve their communities and members, working together, to solve the policing issues. It will allow the commander to plan for results and open the lines of communication with the community and the police, which should lead to better and more efficient utilization of police resources.

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Shawn O'Reilly

Sergeant Shawn O'Reilly

Sgt. O’Reilly has been a member of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary for 26 years. He has completed courses in relation to Fraud Investigation at the Canadian Police College and the Ontario Police College. Presently, Sgt O’Reilly is the Inspections Officer with the RNC, prior to this he spent 4 years as an investigator in the Economic Crime Unit. During his time with that unit he specialized in Internet Fraud.

Presentation Topic:

Sgt. O'Reilly, a 26 year member of The Royal Newfoundland Constabulary has spent 4 years working in the Economic Crime Unit. He will deliver a presentation on Fighting Online Fraud. The participants will receive information describing the various types of Fraud that can occur through the Internet. There will be information on hacking & account take over’s of social networking & email accounts. Other topics covered will include Phishing, Pharming, Phony Classifieds Postings, On Line Auction Fraud, Singles Website Fraud and On Line Retail Fraud. The presenter will review an investigation that began in St. John’s Newfoundland with account take over’s of email and social networking accounts, concluding 18 months later in Kelowna British Columbia with an arrest and conviction.

^ Top of Page

Will O’Reilly

Will O’Reilly

Will O’Reilly retired from the Metropolitan Police in 2009 after 32 years service. A career detective postings including the Regional Crime Squad, Anti-Terrorist Branch, Serious Crime Squad Task Force as well as various London borough’s. Rising to the rank of Detective Chief Inspector he was one of Scotland Yard’s most experienced senior investigating officers responsible for investigating murders and other serious crimes. These included some of London’s most high profile murders, such as the infamous ‘Adam’ torso in the Thames enquiry; the murder of a young child whose dismembered body was found floating in the river Thames. This investigation led to groundbreaking forensic and investigative enquiries in Nigeria, Germany, Holland, USA, Ireland and South Africa. He is now recognised as a principle global authority on ritual and sacrificial murders. He has also lectured on murder investigation generally and forensic developments in the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and various African and European countries.

On leaving the Metropolitan Police Will created and secured UK government funding for a project into human provenance techniques to trace the origins and recent movement of individuals. Managing the project he used groundbreaking forensic disciplines personally pioneered in a successful policing career to detect fraud in the asylum system, protect the UK’s borders and to safeguard vulnerable children at risk of abuse. Working particularly in Africa he has constructed isotopic and ancestral DNA databases for the forensic use of law enforcement agencies worldwide.

More recently he has worked for a large tobacco manufacturer scoping the prevalence of illicit and smuggled tobacco in the UK and their links to organised crime. This criminal trade is costing the UK government £2.2 billion every year in lost revenue.

^ Top of Page

Commissioner Ann-Marie Orler

Commissioner Ann-Marie Orler

Police Adviser and Director of the UN Police Division, Office of Rule of Law and Security Institutions, Department of Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations

Commissioner Ann-Marie Orler was appointed United Nations Police Adviser in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations in March 2010. Before being promoted she served as the Deputy Police Adviser since May 2008. Prior to joining the United Nations she was a police officer and eventually a Police Commissioner with the Swedish National Police for almost 20 years. Apart from her extensive senior level policing experience with the Swedish National Police at the local, regional and headquarter level, Commissioner Orler served from 2001 to 2003 at the Council of Europe as the Programme Manager for the “Police and Human Rights Beyond 2000” programme. She was the Secretary General of Amnesty International in Sweden for a brief period in 1998 and worked for a private Swedish security company Dutra Ledarskap as a Leadership Consultant specializing in leadership on a strategic level in 1999. Commissioner Orler studied journalism in her spare time, is a graduate of the Swedish Police Training Academy and holds a law degree from the University of Uppsala, Sweden.

Presentation Topic:

UN Women in Peace Keepers Panel - High level women police leaders from United Nations international peace operations and beyond discuss leadership techniques, experiences, lessons learned and advice on what it takes to manage complex mandates on policing post-conflict societies. The panel will discuss the importance of partnerships and how to make them work. The session will be a roundtable with an interactive questions and answers format.

Confirmed Members of this Panel are:

Commissioner Ann-Marie Orler, Police Adviser to the United Nations Secretary-General and Director of the Police Division, Office of Rule of Law and Security Institutions, Department of Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations (Sweden)

Assistant Inspector General Kadi Facondo, Donor Coordinator, United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID)

Detective Chief Superintendent, Janice McClean, Senior Police Adviser, United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Sierra Leone (United Kingdom)

Superintendent Shirley Cuillierrier, Director of Immigration and Passport Section, Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Ms. Brooke Darby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, U.S. Department of State

^ Top of Page

Nancy Osborne

Nancy Osborne

Nancy retired as a senior officer with the Canadian Forces after 21 years of service in the areas of police, security and intelligence. In 2002 she became one of the first four women hired by the United Nations Security Coordinator's Office as a Field Security Coordination Officer in support of the UN Agencies, Funds and Programs and went to Sudan to work as the Deputy Chief of Security. Her work in Sudan included security support and advice to humanitarian and development organizations during the war between the north and south and during the initial humanitarian response to the Darfur Crisis. She has also served as a Security Advisor in Lebanon, East Timor, and India. She is now working as a Regional Security Coordinator with UNICEF Headquarters in New York and is a focal point for security support to UNICEF offices and programs in the Middle East, North Africa, South and East Asia, and the Pacific as well as some offices in Central and Eastern Europe. Nancy's background includes extensive experience as a trainer and one of her current projects includes providing women's security awareness training specifically targeting female UNICEF personnel working internationally in high risk environments. Nancy is passionate about her work supporting UNICEF programs worldwide and grateful for the opportunity to be able to utilize the skills she learned during her military/policing career to support the delivery of humanitarian assistance to women and children living in some of the most difficult places in the world.

Presentation Topic:

Major (Retired) Canadian Forces. Ms. Osborne will present on “Where Do I Go from Here?” This presentation will focus on women working in police or military environments often struggle with what comes next. Where do I go from here? Whether it be retirement or a point in life when they are looking for a new challenge, it is sometimes difficult to connect with opportunities that continue to be exciting and challenging but perhaps even more important, rewarding.

^ Top of Page

Sue O’Sullivan

Sue O’Sullivan
Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime

Sue O’Sullivan, a 30 year law enforcement veteran and former Deputy Chief of Police for the Ottawa Police Services, began her term as Canada’s Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime August 16, 2010.

Throughout her law-enforcement career, Ms. O’Sullivan has served in Patrol, Criminal Investigative Services and Operations Support. Ms. O’Sullivan has been a member of the Leadership in Counter Terrorism Alumni Association, a group of senior professional executives who work together to influence local, national and international counter terrorism strategy, and has acted as an advisor to the Auditor General of Canada on National Security in Canada –The 2001 Anti- Terrorism Initiative Audit.

Throughout her career, Ms. O’Sullivan has continually advocated to increase the efficiency of services to victims. Prior to her appointment, Ms. O’Sullivan worked with stakeholders from the victim services community and all three levels of government to develop a coordinated victim assistance program.

Ms. O’Sullivan has been recognized for her leadership both within the service and in the community. Her honours include the Governor General’s Officer of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces Award, the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal, the Governor General’s Exemplary Service Medal and the House of Commons Leadership Award, the YM-YWCA Women of Distinction Award, the St. Joe’s Women’s Centre Quality of Life Award, and the Circle of Canadians Community Service Award.

Ms. O’Sullivan holds a B.A. in Law and Sociology with a subtitle in Criminology and Corrections from Carleton University and is a graduate of the Police Leadership Program (Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police and the University of Toronto

Presentation Topic:

Sue O'Sullivan, Canada's Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime, will present on the importance of ensuring that victims of crime are able to effectively and meaningfully participate in the criminal justice system, as well as discussing effective leadership and managing change. Ms. O'Sullivan may also, as part of her presentation, refer to International initiatives in the field of victims rights.

^ Top of Page

Superintendent Rick Penney

Superintendent Rick Penney, joined the RCMP in 1979. During the course of his career he has been actively engaged in all facets of investigative matters at the local, municipal, national and international level. He has worked on Joint Force Operations as a support investigator, lead investigator, supervisor, manager and National / International Co-ordinator. At present, Superintendent Penney is the Officer in Charge of the Greater Toronto Area Drug Section. This area of operation encompasses a population base of approximately 5.6 million people. As the Officer in Charge he has the operational review and oversight of the Tactical Priority Projects that are currently under investigation as well as establishing a framework to carry strategic plans forward to pursue long- term objectives on designated Criminal enterprise groups. He has been and currently remains involved in the development and formulation of the Source Development Unit. He instructs on the SNIC and have traveled internationally as a representative of the RCMP lecturing on Source Recruitment.

Presentation Topic:

Supt. Penney will draw on his vast experience and expertise to present on two separate topics;

  1. Drug Cartels and Organized Crime; a presentation delivered with the intent to provide insight into the methodology, practices and activity of Criminal Enterprise Groups as they impact the enforcement activity of Canadian Policing and International co-operative efforts in mutual investigations and prosecution.
  2. Proactive Source Recruitment; a presentation delivered with the intent to advise and engage the viewer with the practice of structured and focused source recruitment practices. The aim is to develop situational awareness and engage the audience in the practices of utilizing HUMINT on the front end of a Major OC Project in order to aggressively lead the investigation forward in a controlled and outcome based manner.

^ Top of Page

Mst. Shahala Pervin

Mst. Shahala Pervin

Mst. Shahala Pervin started her career in Bangladesh police as Assistant Superintendent of police in 2003. She worked in Range Reserve Force (RRF), Criminal Investigation Department(CID) with various capacities in the field of administration and personal management. She is serving as Additional Superintendent of Police (Training) in Traffic and Driving School, Dhaka. She also specialized in leading national and international conference on Combating human trafficking, Violence against women, Traffic management system etc. She presented on” Combating human trafficking in Bangladesh” in Lexington, USA in 2011. She is also a freelance writer on various issues which is published in various newspapers and magazines.

She has completed Bachelor of social science and Masters of Political Science from the University of Dhaka. She is married and has a son and a daughter.

Presentation Topic:

Violence against Women - Bangladesh Perspective Violence against women is one of the most shameful of all human rights violations and has become one of the visible social issues in the world, especially in a developing country like Bangladesh. There is no country in the world where violence against women is totally absent . Mst. Pervin will provide information the nature and causes of the violence such as Acid throwing, Victimization by Fatwa, (Religious edict), and domestic violence. Her presentation will speak to the severity of violence against women in Bangladesh, the efforts of the Bangladesh Government and recommendations for action to reduce the problem.

^ Top of Page

Jennifer Porter

Jennifer Porter is the program manager for leadership training programs at the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), where she has served for five years in progressively responsible positions. She is responsible for the management of the Leadership in Police Organizations program, a leadership development program currently in use by law enforcement agencies in four countries including the US and Canada. Jennifer joined IACP after attending West Virginia University and serving with the Federal Inspector General community.

Presentation Topic:

Ms. Jennifer Porter and Director Cecelia Rosser of the IACP as well as Deputy Chief Jennifer Morrison of the Burlington, Vermont Police Department will conduct a presentation on "Developing Current and Future Leaders in Your Department"

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) has worked with over 200 local, state and federal law enforcement departments in the U.S., Canada, Eastern Europe and the Middle East to develop the leaders within their organizations. Based on research on behavioral science theories that was originally developed by personnel at the West Point Military Academy and later modified for the law enforcement environment, students are taught key strategies for leading and motivating first individuals, then groups and organizations. Successful strategies for leading change are also highlighted. These strategies, which also focus on dispersed leadership styles, can be employed on both a professional and personal level. In addition to teaching some of the key strategies, IACP will explain how it works with departments to deliver the program locally, and to develop their staff and instructors so the program can be sustained locally. In addition, they learn to share best practices with other organizations worldwide employing the strategies in their professional development and promotional testing processes.

^ Top of Page

Jim Potts

Jim Potts (“Mah-ki-ki-maqua” - Medicine Bear)

Honorary Lieutenant Colonel and retired RCMP/OPP Inspector, 45 yrs. service (36 yrs. R.C.M.P. 9 yrs. O.P.P.) Of Ojibway decent. First status Indian to reach rank of Inspector in the history of the RCMP. Throughout his service worked to promote understanding between police and aboriginal peoples, to encourage the hiring of aboriginal recruits and to raise the profile of serving aboriginal members.

In 1974 developed the first Cultural Awareness training for the Canadian police universe. Has personally delivered over 100 such course across Canada. Served in various capacities i.e. general duties, highway patrol, detachment commander, I/C C.I.B./Drug squad, O I/C Operational Training, Multiculturalism Advisor, and twelve years as Native Liaison Officer with Mohawk Warriors.

1984 led a team of RCMP members to Grenada to assist in re-establishing Grenada’s Police Service after the invasion of 1983.

1985 Designed and delivered a course on major crime scene investigation techniques for officers at the Eastern Carribean Police Academy, Barbados.

1993 developed the R.C.M.P. ”Native Spirituality Guide.”

1994 Manager of First Nations policing for O.P.P.

1996-99 Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Law University of Western Ontario.

Six years on the Akwesasne Police Commission.

Served as mediator/negotiator during numerous band office occupations, roadblocks and major crisis situations i.e. Oka, Ipperwash, Gustafasen Lake, Burnt Church, and Caledonia.

2005/06, at request of Comm’r of the Ipperwash Inquiry, co-authored paper “For the Nonce - Policing During Aboriginal Occupations and Protest.”

Recipient of numerous awards; 2002 appointed “Officer of the Order of Merit for Police Forces” by Governor General. Currently serves as an advisor to various government departments and is a member of the national RCMP Aboriginal Employees Council. Continues to provide cultural awareness training for RCMP and Cdn. Armed Forces.

2003-2012 Chaired six national Aboriginal Policing Conferences.

2011 to present- member of steering committee for Aboriginal Police Training at the Canadian Police College

Recently the Minister of National Defence appointed Jim as the first Honorary Lieutenant Colonel for the 5000 Canadian Ranger Patrol Group for isolated First Nations communities across northern Canada. Currently working in that capacity, based out of CFB Borden.

Jim is the proud father of daughter Kerry, resides in Ottawa and recently celebrated his 48th. wedding anniversary with his wife Roberta.

Presentation Topic:

Retired RCMP/OPP Inspector Jim Potts will present on "STRATEGIES, TIPS AND IDEAS TO DEAL WITH CURRENT ISSUES IN ABORIGINAL POLICING IN CANADA." This presentation will provide an overview of Aboriginal Policing in Canada, examine the current issues and the implications for police, today, and in the coming years. To do this he will tell various stories, provide numerous strategies that apply to every day life and actually working in Aboriginal communities both in northern and southern Canada. As he was directly involved in writing the first training program for women in the RCMP IN 1974, he will speak about the acceptance/resistance of the rank of file of the day. He was also directly involved as a mediator in the five major Aboriginal conflict situations in Canada since 1990 and will briefly outline what went on behind the lines, and provide food for thought for officers who one day may find themselves working during similar stressful incidents.

^ Top of Page

Constable Claire Priddle

Constable Claire Priddle has worked with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (RNC) since September of 2005, and has held the position of Forensic Artist since May of 2008.

In 2002 she graduated from Sir Wilfred Grenfell with a BFA in Fine Arts, and in 2005 graduated from Memorial University of Newfoundland with a Diploma in Police Studies. Shortly into her policing career she attended a Composite Sketch Artist Apprenticeship Program with the RCMP, followed by the FBI Forensic Facial Imaging Course in Quantico. In 2011 she graduated with an MSc in Forensic art at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Current duties at the RNC include composing composite sketches for witnesses of crimes who are able to provide a description of the suspect, conducting photographic comparisons, and facial reconstructions. In addition, she works with the Forensic Investigating Interviewing Unit, assisting with witness interviews and P.E.A.C.E. Model of Investigative Interviewing training.

Claire looks forward to developing this aspect of her career, merging her experience of cognitive interviewing techniques with the practical application of the P.E.A.C.E. model. She also hopes to expand research in methods used to compose composite art, aiming to improve their accuracy.

Presentation Topic:

Recognizing a strangers face may not seem very important, that is, until you are the witness of a crime. Not every crime is captured on video and not every crime scene yields forensic evidence. Sometimes a witnesss memory is the only link to the suspect. Under such circumstances, a Composite Practitioner may be required; whose goal is to transpose a memory of the suspect into a tangible image used by police.

This presentation will focus on Composite Art, how it may benefit police, as well as the important role an investigating officer plays in the composites success.

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Lana Prosper

Sgt. Lana Prosper, has been a Member of the RCMP for 19 years. Lana started her policing career in Newfoundland and Labrador, and after 11 years moved to Ottawa to work at the National Child Exploitation Co-ordination Centre(NCECC), while posted there she worked in operations, training and victim identification. In 2010 the Government announced funding for a National Centre for Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains (NCMPUR), and she was transferred there to assist in the set up of the new Centre.

Presentation Topic:

As the Non Commissioned Officer in Charge of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s National Centre for Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains (NCMPUR) , Sgt. Prosper will be presenting on this new unit created to support law enforcement, medical examiners and chief coroners with missing persons and unidentified remains cases on a national level.

^ Top of Page

Staff Sergeant Gisèle Rivest

Staff Sergeant Rivest joined the RCMP in 1982. Over the past 30 years she has worked as a law enforcement officer in the Traffic Unit, an investigator with Drug Enforcement, a body guard/driver responsible for the protection of dignitaries and VIPs, an investigator with Immigration and Passports Section and as a Commercial Crime investigator working on domestic corruption. In 2003, she was transferred to RCMP Headquarters (HQ) as an analyst, and later as the Lead Investigator on a sensitive investigation project. In 2009, she returned to HQ as an analyst for Sensitive Investigations. Currently, she is a member the new International Anti-Corruption Unit, primarily responsible for policy.

Presentation Topic:

Staff Sergeant Rivest will conduct a workshop in which the goal is to raise awareness of the International Anti-Corruption global movement. The session will explain the effects of corruption on society as well as provide background information about the anti-corruption initiative. She will present an overview of the efforts by international organizations such as the OECD, UN and OAS to monitor and assess the compliance of various countries to fight corruption. The workshop will also discuss Canadas efforts in this endeavor and present an example of a successful case on the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act.

^ Top of Page

Constable Paul Roche

Paul Roche is a Constable with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (RNC) who has 23 years of service. He has served as both a uniform and plain clothes investigator and was assigned to the National Weapons Enforcement Support team in 2008. In his current position Constable Roche has received specialized training in “Characteristics of an Armed Person” along with other advanced firearms courses.

Presentation Topic:

Royal Newfoundland Constabulary. currently assigned to the National Weapons Enforcement Support Team. Cst. Roche will deliver a presentation on the Characteristics of Armed Persons, which will develop the knowledge and skills of front line law enforcement officers to recognize a person who “may be” armed.

Constable Paul Roche and Constable Chris Young:

As witnessed through videos, media reports, and officer experiences, individuals possess or have access to firearms on a more frequent basis. As such, in the interest of public and personal safety, it is extremely important for front-line police officers to be able to recognize the signs and indications that an individual is armed. Together, Cst. Roche and Cst. Young will conduct a presentation that will provide information to the delegates that will allow them to:

  1. Determine an individual's dominant side
  2. Distinguish methods and types of firearm concealment and positioning of makeshift holsters
  3. Identify the body movements and behavioral patterns of an armed person
  4. Recognize the clothing characteristics of an armed person
  5. Identify characteristics relative to stopping a vehicle containing an armed person

^ Top of Page

Cecelia Rosser

Cecelia Rosser is the Director of the Center for Police Leadership and Training at the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP). In that capacity she and her staff have responsibility for domestic classroom, leadership, tuition, and online training as well as a number of international training initiatives. Prior to joining IACP in 2009, she served as the Deputy Inspector General (IG) at the US Postal Service and as the Assistant IG for Investigations there with a nationwide staff of 450 investigators in over 65 locations. Prior to Postal, she served as the Deputy Assistant IG for Investigations at the Department of Transportation IG and at a number of supervisory and street agent positions in the federal law enforcement community for 22 years.

Presentation Topic:

Director Cecelia Rosser and Ms. Jennifer Porter of the IACP as well as Deputy Chief Jennifer Morrison of the Burlington, Vermont Police Department will conduct a presentation on "Developing Current and Future Leaders in Your Department"

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) has worked with over 200 local, state and federal law enforcement departments in the U.S., Canada, Eastern Europe and the Middle East to develop the leaders within their organizations. Based on research on behavioral science theories that was originally developed by personnel at the West Point Military Academy and later modified for the law enforcement environment, students are taught key strategies for leading and motivating first individuals, then groups and organizations. Successful strategies for leading change are also highlighted. These strategies, which also focus on dispersed leadership styles, can be employed on both a professional and personal level. In addition to teaching some of the key strategies, IACP will explain how it works with departments to deliver the program locally, and to develop their staff and instructors so the program can be sustained locally. In addition, they learn to share best practices with other organizations worldwide employing the strategies in their professional development and promotional testing processes.

^ Top of Page

M.C. (Marianne) Ryan

M.C. (Marianne) Ryan
Assistant Commissioner,
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Criminal Operations Officer “K” Division (Alberta)

Assistant Commissioner Marianne Ryan has been a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for 30 years. She began her career in law enforcement after graduating from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, with a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Assistant Commissioner Ryan spent the first 19 years of her RCMP service in “D” Division (Manitoba) carrying out various operational uniform and plainclothes duties. She has extensive operational police experience at the local, national and international levels, leading major investigations targeting organized crime groups involved in a myriad of criminal activities including drugs, proceeds of crime and organized crime. She has been recognized by the courts as an expert witness in drugs and proceeds of crime investigations and has lectured at several international forums and conferences.

In 2001, Assistant Commissioner Ryan was commissioned as an Inspector and assigned to the position of Operations Officer for the RCMP Integrated Proceeds of Crime Section in Vancouver. In 2003, she was appointed as the Officer in Charge of the Vancouver Integrated Proceeds of Crime Section and in 2004 she was promoted to the rank of Superintendent at the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of British Columbia (CFSEU-BC), where she later assumed the role as Chief Officer for CFSEU-BC. In this capacity, she managed a large integrated unit of seconded police resources from the RCMP, municipal police departments and the Organized Crime Agency with a mandate to disrupt organized and serious crime in British Columbia.

In May 2008, Assistant Commissioner Ryan assumed the role of Pacific Region Coordinator for the Change Management Team and in August 2009, she accepted the position as Human Resources Officer for the Pacific Region. In this role, she had the responsibility and oversight of all human resource related issues for approximately 9,000 RCMP employees in the Pacific Region.

Assistant Commissioner Ryan became the Officer in Charge of Criminal Operations Branch, for RCMP “K” Division (Alberta) in January, 2011 and resides with her partner and their family in Edmonton.

Presentation Topic:

How do you respond when disaster strikes a community that you police?

How do you safely evacuate residents of a community when the heat of a devastating fire wipes out a community's infrastructure melting water, gas and underground power lines, and the sewer and water purification systems? How do you protect and ensure the safety of your front line personnel when the air is so toxic that police experience respiratory problems? How you mobilize police resources expediently and sustain these resources over several weeks?

Assistant Commissioner Marianne Ryan is the Officer in Charge of Criminal Operations for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) for the Province of Alberta, Canada and she will share the challenges, response and best practices which occurred during a disaster which struck the town of Slave Lake in the Province of Alberta in May 2011.

^ Top of Page

Sanja Sumonja

Sanja Sumonja

Inspector for the Ministry of Interior Republic of Srpska Bosnia and Herzegovina

Sanja Sumonja is an Inspector for the Ministry of Interior Republic of Srpska Bosnia and Herzegovina. She is currently assigned as an Inspector of juvenile delinquency.

She has participated in numerous seminars, lectures, scientific conferences, research, projects and training in areas including human rights, nonviolent communication, juvenile delinquency, domestic violence, sexual abuse;

She spearheaded a project of forming a network of Women Police Officers of South East Europe (WPON) organized by SEPCA /Southeast Europe Police Chiefs Association. She serves as a chair of the Board of Directors.

Inspector Sumonja Completed her post graduate studies, Faculty of Security and Protection, Banja Luka, Department of Criminology and holds a Master of Science title.

Presentation Topic:

Mandates and political pressures have required many police departments to hire woman police officers; some departments see this as obligatory. These female officers are too often not utilized to their fullest potential. Experience and research indicate that women in leadership and decision-making roles are essential to maintaining stability, prosperity, peace and security throughout the world. Women make profound contributions in these areas; yet, females still represent only a small percent of police forces worldwide. Several nations have undertaken police reform initiatives, which include examining, gender roles, social barriers, training police leadership, and assessing internal police culture. By effectively highlighting the importance of inclusion and mainstreaming women into all areas of police service the departments, the presence of women police can strengthen reforming police forces and have significant impact on the police services.

Colonel (Retired) Linda Mayberry will be the facilitator for a Leadership Panel - Diversifying and Mainstreaming Female Police Officers.

Panel Members:

Gwen Boniface, Transnations Organized Crime Expert, United Nations. Police Division, New York, U.S.A.; former Commissioner Ontario Provincial Police.

Ms. M. Brooke Darby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of State, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs.

Sanja Sumonja, Inspector for the Ministry of Interior Republic of Srpska Bosnia and Herzegovina

Ellison E. Greenslade, Police Commissioner, Royal Bahamas Police Force, Nassau, Bahamas

^ Top of Page

Lt. Colonel (Ret'd) Cindy Shain

Lt. Colonel (Ret'd) Cindy Shain

Associate Director, Southern Police Institute
University of Louisville, Louisville, KY USA
Cindy.Shain@louisville.edu 

Lt. Colonel (Ret'd) Cindy Shain has served as Associate Director of the Southern Police Institute (SPI) since 2009 where she oversees professional development programs. She retired as Deputy Chief of the Louisville Police Department with 24 years of law enforcement experience in the largest urban police agency in Kentucky. Shain serves as Chair of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) International Managers of Police Academy & College Training Section. She has been a member of the International Association of Women Police (IAWP) for over 20 years. Since 2006, she has served, along with Linda Mayberry, as Co-Chair of the IAWP International Scholarship Committee. She represents the IAWP as a member of the INTERPOL Group of Experts on Police Training and is a member of IACP’s Education & Training Committee and the National Center for Women and Policing Advisory Board. She is a founding member of the Kentucky Women’s Law Enforcement Network. Shain presents internationally for the U.S. Departments of Justice and State and is a national speaker on leadership and issues affecting women in law enforcement. She is involved in initiatives which serve to further democratic policing practices and community policing in global environments. She holds a Masters Degree from Eastern Kentucky University and a Bachelor’s Degree from Bellarmine University. She is a former Rotary International Scholar and recipient of the Tower Award for Women Leaders and the Kentucky Women’s Law Enforcement Network’s Contributions to Law Enforcement and Lifetime Achievement Awards. In 2009, she was the recipient of the Women Leading Kentucky Martha Layne Collins Leadership Award and, in 2011, she was selected as Alumna of the Year at Sacred Heart Academy.

Presentation Topic:

As women enter the law enforcement profession, it is important to think about "positioning" themselves for a successful career from the moment they are hired. The purpose of this interactive workshop is to provoke thought and to provide some strategies for women in law enforcement to ensure success. Participants will review their own careers by assessing and setting professional goals and objectives; surveying personal strengths and weaknesses; developing and implementing a Professional Development Plan; and improving their overall "marketability" for careers post-retirement.

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Clare Smart

Calgary Police Service, Sergeant Clare Smart

Sgt. Clare Smart joined the Calgary Police Service in 1996, and has worked in a variety of areas, including general patrol, criminal investigations, the Professional Standards Section and the Serious Habitual Offenders Program.

Sgt. Smart participated in her first mission, the United Nations African Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) Sudan, from October 2010 to October 2011, working under the Police Commissioner as an Auditing and Internal Evaluations Officer.

During her mission, she volunteered with the local Girl Guides and Boys Scouts. She was also selected to participate in the UN Games in Austria, winning a bronze medal in women's volleyball.

She now works as the sergeant in the Youth Mentorship Programs Unit.

Sgt. Smart has a degree in Criminal Justice and in 2010 received her Master's in Business Administration.

Presentation Topic:

RCMP, Staff Sergeant Julie Faucher, Toronto Police Service, Cst. Marie-Josée Fournier, and Calgary Police Service, Sgt. Clare Smart

Together they will conduct a presentation on "A Police Woman’s Place Is in Mission: Making a Difference for Women in Some of the World’s Most Challenging Places." This workshop will aim to provide police women with an understanding of the tremendous development opportunities available through deployments to international peace operations, as well as the chance to make a very real and concrete difference in the lives of people who live in failed and fragile states. It will also illustrate how police women training and mentoring other police women in these countries act as critical role models not only for those they mentor, but also for the women, children and men in the population.

^ Top of Page

Brent Snook

Brent Snook

Brent Snook is an Associate Professor in Psychology at Memorial University of Newfoundland. He holds a PhD in Psychology from The University of Liverpool, UK. His research interests include decision making, forensic psychology, investigative and interviewing practices, and pseudoscience in the criminal justice system. Brent's work has led him to collaborate with academics and law enforcement officers around the world. His current body of work involves how people understand their legal rights and testing the effectiveness of the PEACE model of interviewing.

Presentation Topic:

Professor Brent Snook and Constable Todd Barron

Professor Snook, an Associate Professor of Psychology at Memorial University of Newfoundland, and Cst. Barron a police officer with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, will jointly conduct a presentation on suspect interviewing using the PEACE Model.

^ Top of Page

Cst. Amber Smith

Cst. Smith, a member of the of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, is currently attached to the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) .The NCECC conducts child exploitation investigations on a National and International level. It is comprised of several sections, which include but is not limited to Operations, Strategic and Ops support, Research and Development. Included in the Operations section is the Victim Identification Section. Within this section regular and civilian members work with various police agencies around the world helping to identify and rescue children. There is a Victim Identification lab that is mobile.

Presentation Topic:

Presentation of the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) Victim Identification Lab:

Together, Cst. Smith and Cst. Thomas Nairne will have the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC) Victim Identification Lab set up for viewing.

Officially launched in June 2009, the NCECC victim identification lab is a web-based application that allows registered users to view sanitized child sexual exploitation images from unsolved international investigations. Once registered, users enter the system and can scroll over the icons to access the category of their choice. The user can add information/comments that may enhance the investigation to any of the files. The underlying premise of the VI lab is that the more investigator eyes that are on an image, the more likely it is the location, artifacts, and/or victim depicted will be identified. This is a clear example of applying a global law enforcement response strategy to address border less crimes.

^ Top of Page

Joy Smith

Joy Smith, MP - Kildonan – St. Paul

MP Joy Smith holds a Bachelor's Degree (B.Ed.) and a Master's Degree (M.Ed.) in education and was a teacher for 23 years devoted to educating high school students in mathematics and science.

Mrs. Smith is also a best-selling author and a recipient of the Hedley Award for Excellence in Research. She was nominated as Manitoba's Woman Entrepreneur of the Year. She is also a wife and mother of six children.

Before becoming Member of Parliament for Kildonan - St. Paul, Mrs. Smith was the Member of the Manitoba Legislature (MLA) for Fort Garry and served as critic for Justice, Education, and Intergovernmental (Urban) Affairs. She also led the Manitoba Task Force for Building Sustainable Communities.

PARLIAMENT HILL

Mrs. Smith was first elected to the House of Commons in 2004 and was re-elected in 2006 and 2008. In November 2007, Mrs. Smith was appointed Chair of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health and was reappointed in 2008. The health of Canadians is of utmost concern to Mrs. Smith and as the Chair of the Health Committee she is diligently working to ensure Canadian health issues are effectively addressed.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING EFFORTS

Mrs. Smith has been recognized as one of Canada's leading anti-trafficking activists. Since being elected, Mrs. Smith has led the discussion on human trafficking at a national level which has resulted important changes in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Her continued efforts to raise the issue of human trafficking on the Status of Women Committee resulted in an intensive study of the issue by the committee and the release of highly regarded report on human trafficking in 2007 called Turning Outrage Into Action.

One of her major achievements was the unanimous passing by the House of Commons in 2007 of her Private Members Motion M-153 on human trafficking which called on Parliament to condemn the trafficking of women and children across international borders for the purposes of sexual exploitation and to immediately adopt a comprehensive strategy to combat the trafficking of persons worldwide. Over the past few years, Mrs. Smith has worked with federal Ministers on key legislation to further combat human trafficking and protect its victims.

Mrs. Smith has also been acknowledged for securing federal funding to fight the trafficking of aboriginal women and children from First Nations communities from across Canada.

In September 2010, Mrs. Smith released a proposal for a National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking called Connecting the Dots. This proposal has been strongly endorsed by law enforcement, agencies and victims groups across Canada and adopted by the Conservative election platform in the recent election.

CHILD TRAFFICKING LEGISLATION

In 2009, Mrs. Smith introduced Bill C-268, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (minimum sentence for offences involving trafficking of persons under the age of eighteen years). This Bill amended Section 279.01 of Canada’s Criminal Code to create a new offence for child trafficking with a five year mandatory penalty.

Bill C-268 has received broad support from stakeholders in the fight against human trafficking including law enforcement, victims’ services, First Nations representatives, and religious and secular non-governmental organizations.

Mrs. Smith has worked with her colleagues across party lines to gain support for this important legislation. On September 30, 2009, Bill C-268 received near unanimous support from Conservative, Liberal and NDP parties and was passed by the House of Commons in spite of opposition by the Bloc Quebecois.

On June 29, 2010, Bill C-268 was granted Royal Assent and became law. The successful passage of a Private Members Bill is rare and it is only the 15th time in the history of the Canada that a Private Members Bill amended the Criminal Code.

NEW LEGISLATION - BILL C-310

On October 3, 2011, MP Joy Smith introduced Bill C-310, An Act to Amend the Criminal Code (trafficking in persons). Bill C-310 will amend the Criminal Code of Canada to make two important changes regarding human trafficking. First, Bill C-310 will amend the Criminal Code to add the current trafficking in persons offences [s.279.01 and s.279.011] to the list of offences which, if committed outside Canada by a Canadian or permanent resident, could be prosecuted in Canada. The second amendment will enhance the current definition of exploitation in the trafficking in persons offence [s.279.04 of the Criminal Code].

Presentation Topic:

Member of Parliament for Kildonan - St. Paul. Mrs. Smith has been recognized as one of Canada’s leading anti-trafficking activists. Since being elected, she had led the discussion on human trafficking at a national level which has resulted in important changes in the Immigration and Refugees Protection Act. Mrs. Smith's continued efforts to raise the issue of human trafficking on the Status of Women Committee resulted in an intensive study of the issues by the committee and the release of highly regarded report on human trafficking in 2007 called Turning Outrage into Action.

^ Top of Page

Constable Joe Smyth

Cst. Smyth has been a member of the RNC for the past eleven years, the first six being as a front line officer with the Street Patrol Division. In 2006 he was assigned to oversee the Department's Graffiti Management Project which involved the creation of collaborative community based Acton plan, coupled with the active investigation of all graffiti related crime. He was later assigned to the Criminal Investigation Division where he was mandated to investigate general property crime and Armed Robbery offences.

In 2008 he was reassigned to the Criminal Intelligence Unit. The CIU has a myriad of mandates, one of which being a central repository of information and intelligence related to all sorts of criminal activity, while ensuring the effective dissemination of applicable and viable intelligence. This would include persons engaged and suspected to be engaged in various crimes, including those motivated by hate. Cst. Smyth has completed training in Forensic Interviewing, Search and Seizure, Criminal Intelligence, Hate Crime Investigation, Hate Crime Awareness, Source development, Threat Assessments and Managing Targeted Violence. He is currently assigned the Premiers Protection Detail.

Cst. Smyth has previously presented at National Intelligence Courses, Crime Prevention Conferences, and RNC Recruit Training programs and Newfoundland and Labrador Violence Prevention Conference.

Presentation Topic:

A member of the Criminal Investigation Division of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary. Cst. Smyth's topic is Hate Crimes and Sexual Orientation. This presentation provides participants insight into a unique crime and victim pool that permeates all cultures around the globe. Police play a vital role in education, awareness, and the investigation and prosecution of offenders. Incidents of hate that are motivated by sexual orientation have a significant impact on an already stigmatized group whom are often struggling with societal perception. A significant number of teen suicides have been attributed to this issue. Through education and awareness, police officers are armed with the necessary information and understanding to have a positive impact on victims, and better investigate incidents.

^ Top of Page

Kristy Spalding

Dr. Kirsty Spalding

Originally from Perth, Australia, Dr Spalding received her PhD from the University of Western Australia, the School of Anatomy and Human Biology, in the field of Neuroscience.

In 2002 Dr. Spalding moved to Stockholm, Sweden as an Ambassadorial Academic Scholar for one year. This was followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at the Karolinska Institute (KI). Since 2006 Dr. Spalding has been an Assistant Professor at the Karolinska Institute. During her postdoctoral training Dr. Spalding developed a technique using carbon dating and above-ground bomb-testing to study cell turnover in humans. She subsequently adapted this strategy to study enamel turnover in humans as a means of establishing the date of birth of an individual. This technique is now used as a tool in forensics to help make person identification/s.

Presentation Topic:

Dr. Spalding is an assistant professor at the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. She will present on the forensic application of Carbon-14 Bomb Pulse Dating in determining age and death estimation in the investigation of unidentified human remains. Her work has significant implications in the investigations where the identification of human remains is problematic.

^ Top of Page

Karoline H. Starkgraff

Detective Chief Superintendent Karoline H. Starkgraff

Detective Chief Superintendent (Kriminaldirektorin) Starkgraff joined the Hamburg Police, Germany, in 1982. In 1997, in the wake of German reunification, she left Hamburg to join Saxony Police to help establish a democratic police service in a former socialist German county in Eastern Germany. Immediately she was granted tenure for criminal law and criminal procedure law at Saxony’s Police University of Applied Sciences.

Chief Superintendent Starkgraff has been a career detective serving as an investigator in every rank. She is an experienced Senior Investigating Officer having led homicide and arson investigations, anti-terrorist inquiries, drug-related and covert operations. In 2001, she was appointed Chief of Criminal Investigation and over the years commanded three different Criminal Investigation Departments with up to 300 plus sworn officers. Among other tasks she took responsibility in a major amalgamation process within Saxony Police in 2003/2004. In 1996 Superintendent Starkgraff held senior command posts with the voluntary multinational police team during the Olympic Games in Atlanta, GA, U.S.A.

She is head of law faculty at Saxony Police University, where she lectures mainly but not exclusively on criminal procedure law. She has lectured on forensics, criminology, and evidence and procedure for law students at Bucerius Law School, Hamburg, Germany, and, in 2010, addressed the German Defence Lawyers’ Annual Conference. She is published both nationally and internationally and regularly attends conferences throughout Europe. She is active member of and engaged in several police-related and/or legal institutions, notably IAWP and IACP/IMPACT section. She holds a first class honours degree in law from Hamburg University and successfully undertook a two-year pupillage including state examinations with the Hanseatic High Court in Hamburg.

Presentation Topic:

Detective Chief Superintendent Karoline H. Starkgraff and Erica-Maria Umbricht

Together they will speak on Character Building through Legal and Ethics Training.

This workshop addresses pressing ethical issues and situations which active officers face every day. We will concentrate on our experiences with young recruits, their ways of learning and understanding which are very different today compared to what their seniors used to experience. Case by case we'll enable all participants, beginners and experienced officers, those in leadership positions and those striving to achieve higher rank, to understand the importance of good legal and ethics training, to tackle dilemmas and to rise personally to the challenges of the job. Both presenters benefit from extensive teaching experience, a through professional background and leadership positions in their respective police agencies.

^ Top of Page

Lesley Tomblin, M.Sc

Lesley Tomblin was the first DFLA hired in Canada on July 2, 1996. She was born in Calgary, Alberta and lived in Halifax for two years, Vancouver for six years and has now lived in St. John's, NL since 1985. Lesley has a Bachelor in Physical Education from the University of British Columbia (1986) and a Master of Science in Medicine from Memorial University of Newfoundland (2002). Her thesis topic was on: "Health Trends in a Canadian Police Force: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Study". Lesley evaluated the physical health assessments (PHAs) of "B" Division members over a 5 year period. She is also certified by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology as a Certified Exercise Physiologist (CEP).

Prior to working for the RCMP, Lesley worked as a Fitness Consultant and Supervisor of the Fitness Section, Division of Recreation, Sport and Fitness of the Newfoundland Provincial Government for ten years. She has participated in many national fitness initiatives, such as the launch of Active Living and was the Provincial Business Manager of the Newfoundland Fitness Appraisal Certification and Accreditation's Committee for many years.

Lesley exercises most days of the week either in the gym, the pool or outdoors. She especially loves the outdoors and can be found hiking, ocean kayaking, biking, snowshoeing or walking her dogs. If you are visiting "B" Division HQ, Lesley is always happy to take new people out for a hike on the East Coast Trail which has stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean and is located in the beautiful scenic hills behind the HQ building.

Lesley's belief in the importance of health is reflected in the quote by Jim Rohn: "Take care of your body. It's the only place you have to live.

Presentation Topic:

RCMP “B” Division, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. Ms. Tomblin has an extensive background in fitness prior to joining the RCMP. Ms. Tomblin will present on how the RCMP is encouraging the Health and Fitness for Duty of their female police officers. Ms. Tomblin’s belief in the importance of health is reflected in the quote by Jim Rohn “Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.”

^ Top of Page

Chief Inspector Jane Townsley

Chief Inspector Jane Townsley

Jane is a Chief Inspector with the British Transport Police in the UK and has been a police officer for 25 years. She has been a long time member of the British Association for Women in Policing (BAWP) and is President of the IAWP. Throughout her police career she has been involved in issues that particularly effect females within the service representing the female perspective on various committees both within her Force and nationally on behalf of the BAWP. In 2003 she initiated setting up a female network within the British Transport Police specifically to progress the Gender Agenda in the Force. As a member of the BAWP committee she is one of a group of committee members who have responsibility for each of the aims within Gender Agenda 2.

Jane joined the IAWP in 1996, attending her first annual training conference in Birmingham, England the same year. She has only missed one conference, in 1999, and in 2000 became a member of the Board of Directors as the Region 13 (Europe) Coordinator. She remained in that position for two terms during which time she was the conference coordinator for the 43rd Annual training conference in 2005 in Leeds, England. In 2006 Jane became 1st Vice President. She took over as Acting President in April of 2009 and formally took over as President in September 2009.

As a member of the Board of Directors Jane has worked on the Strategic Planning committee which guided the develop of a strategic plan, first published in 2006. She also project managed a fundamental review of the IAWP magazine resulting in the current WomenPolice which was launched in September 2009.

Jane has represented IAWP at a number of events and initiatives across the Globe, In 2005 she attended the launching ceremony of the first female police officer network in Zugdidi, Georgia, as guest of UNMIG. In 2008 she attended the launch ceremony of the Bangladesh Police Women’s Network in Dhaka, and in 2009 as a guest of OSCE attended an initial meeting in Belgrade to support the setting up of a network in the Balkan region by SEPCA (South Eastern Europe Police Chiefs Association) and in 2010 attended the launch of this regional network.

Presentation Topic:

IAWP President Jane Townsley, Deputy Chief Leanne Fitch, and Deputy Commissioner Amena Begum

Together, they will conduct a First-Time Attendees Workshop which will provide an overview of the conference training and activities. You will be introduced to the IAWP president Jane Townsley, who will discuss the history, mission, and goals of the IAWP and the 2012 conference. Hear tips to take advantage of all opportunities that IAWP has to offer. Learn why some consider the networking opportunities at the conference, and through the organization, to be among one of the most important opportunities for women working in law enforcement. Hear the personal experience of how IAWP made a change in the professional and personal life of one of its members. THIS SESSION IS SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR FIRST TIME ATTENDEES ONLY.

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Edith Turner

Patrol Sergeant Edith Turner was born and raised on the Misipawistik Cree Nation (Grand Rapids First Nation) in the Province of Manitoba, Canada. As a child of a residential school survivor, P/Sgt Turner recognized the importance and value of having positive role models in her community.

In 1994, Patrol Sergeant Edith Turner began her policing career when she joined the Winnipeg Police Service. Over the past eighteen years, she has worked in various areas within the Service from general patrol in uniformed operations to community policing and as an investigator in the Divisional Detective unit. While in the Criminal Investigations Bureau, P/Sgt Turner worked in the Organized Crime Unit, the Drug Unit and in the Gang Unit. During this time, P/Sgt Turner specialized as an undercover operative where her skills and abilities were recognized outside of the Province of Manitoba. In 2004, she was called upon to take on a Afirst@ for a female police officer in Canada, to be embedded in a prison in the Province of Ontario. During this highly stressful and dangerous operation, P/Sgt Turner infiltrated a prison in southern Ontario with the goal of obtaining evidence from a female accused of murder. After this harrowing four day operation, P/Sgt Turner was successful in obtaining crucial evidence securing a 2nd degree murder conviction.

From her success in Ontario, P/Sgt Turner has assisted in the training of numerous Aboriginal operatives in disrupting organized crime activities in Aboriginal communities across Canada in conjunction with the Canadian Police College in Ottawa, Ontario. She has also lectured on her experiences during her undercover operations in the Province of Manitoba and throughout Canada. P/Sgt Turner is currently in charge of the Aboriginal and Diversity Unit providing training within Winnipeg Police Service and working on numerous steering committees to assist in strengthening the relationship between members of the Aboriginal community and the Winnipeg Police Service.

Presentation Topic:

In 2004, Patrol Sgt. Edith Turner took on a “first” for a female police officer in Canada; to be embedded in a prison in the Province of Ontario with the goal of obtaining evidence from a female accused of murder. After this harrowing four day operation she was successful in obtaining crucial inculpatory statements that led to the successful prosecution of this female securing a 2nd degree murder conviction. P/Sgt Turner developed a unique system of doodle notes to assist her in providing testimony many months later. This system is now highlighted in undercover courses across Canada to help members in documenting their experiences for court purposes.

During her presentation, P/Sgt Turner will share her experiences and give participants insight into how she prepared for this assignment and how this covert operation impacted her life. P/Sgt Turner will also outline some of the mental and physical skills one needs to possess and how take advantage of one’s personal strengths and reduce one’s weakness when in participating in a dangerous covert operation such as this.

^ Top of Page

Erica-Maria Umbricht

Erica-Maria Umbricht

Erica-Maria Umbricht entered the Kantonspolizei Aargau, Switzerland, after having worked for the CICR (International CommitteeRed Cross) as a Chief Superintendent dealing mainly with complains against police officers with a special focus on unethical behavior. In this context she setup a quality management system first in the district of Aargau, Switzerlandand in 2006 at the National Police Academy in Hitzkirch.

In addition she is a senior lecturer at the National Police Academy and holds the office of head of the human rights and ethics faculty, where she lectures on all topics dealing with human rights and police ethics at all levels of police education. She also has lectured and lectures at the European Police College, GB.

Erica-Maria Umbricht holds a Masters Degree in History and International Law both from Zürich University, Switzerland and from the University of Manchester, GB.

Presentation Topic:

Detective Chief Superintendent Karoline H. Starkgraff and Erica-Maria Umbricht

Together they will speak on Character Building through Legal and Ethics Training.

This workshop addresses pressing ethical issues and situations which active officers face every day. We will concentrate on our experiences with young recruits, their ways of learning and understanding which are very different today compared to what their seniors used to experience. Case by case we'll enable all participants, beginners and experienced officers, those in leadership positions and those striving to achieve higher rank, to understand the importance of good legal and ethics training, to tackle dilemmas and to rise personally to the challenges of the job. Both presenters benefit from extensive teaching experience, a through professional background and leadership positions in their respective police agencies.

^ Top of Page

Sergeant Grace Warkentine, BA

Grace will always be, at heart, a happy farm kid from sunny Saskatchewan. After growing up in a beautiful parkland area of the province she obtained a B.A. from the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. She ‘side-lined’ her interest in literature in lieu of making a living in early 1989 by joining the RCMP as a regular member. She jumped at the opportunity to live in Quebec and become bilingual through full-time French training in Montreal with the Force and after basic training at Depot she was posted to Manitoba.

Depot allusions to the challenges of work in “D” Division were intimidating but the reality of living and working with friendly Manitobans was always rewarding, even when an interaction with clients started less than congenially! Eight years of general duty were followed by two years of surveillance in Winnipeg, where it seemed like each one of the almost 700,000 residents were trying to drive across the same bridge at the same time. Luckily, a promotion to become an instructor at Depot set her up for six more sunny, but busy, years in Regina and many entertaining hours on the Parade Square.

Accepting a transfer to the National Recruiting Program in 2006 brought Grace to Ottawa and National HQ. In 2008 her career plan fell to a well-executed coup d'etat staged by her body. Diagnosed with breast cancer, she was off work for nearly two years of treatment and recovery time. Now cancer-free, she is coping with the demands of working part-time and long-term recovery full-time. She is attempting to re-balance her life by reintegrating hobbies and wellness where previously she had focused too narrowly on her work. Through her progressive Return to Work Program as a liaison officer with the National Fitness & Lifestyle Program she hopes that sharing her wellness-focused perspective will inspire others to share their challenges, motivations and successes in bringing their lives into balance.

Presentation Topic:

RCMP National Fitness & Lifestyle Program, Ottawa, Ontario. Sgt. Warkentine has served in the RCMP for 24 years. In 2008 she was diagnosed with breast cancer and was off work for approximately two years for treatment and recovery. Now cancer free, she is coping with the demands of working part-time and long-term recovery. Through Sgt. Warkentine progressive Return to Work Program as a liaison officer with the National Fitness and Lifestyle Program she hopes that sharing her wellness-focused perspective will inspire others to share their challenges, motivations and successes in bringing their lives into balance.

^ Top of Page

Professor Caroline Wilkinson

Professor Caroline Wilkinson

Caroline is currently Professor of Craniofacial Identification in the Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification at the University of Dundee, Scotland. She specialises in craniofacial identification, facial image analysis, depiction of the dead and facial recognition for identification.

Caroline has a BSc Hons in Physiology & Anatomy, an MPhil in Medical Art and a PhD in Facial Anthropology. She has trained professionals in craniofacial identification from all over the world, including Australia, Korea, Malaysia, USA, Canada, Europe, China, Japan, India and South Africa.

She is associate member on the Facial Identification Scientific Working Group (FISWG) sponsored by the FBI Academy and Department of Defence Central Identification Laboratory, USA and is involved in the creation of international standards for the use of Facial Image Comparison in Law Enforcement.

She is author of Forensic Facial Reconstruction, was the first woman President of the International Association of Craniofacial identification (IACI) in 2008 and is currently Chair of the International Craniofacial Approximation/Reconstruction Committee.

Caroline has been involved in many archaeological investigations and her work is exhibited in museums around the world, and her research team have reconstructed the faces of key historical figures, such as J.S. Bach, St Nicolas and Arsinoe, sister of Cleopatra.

Presentation Topic:

Professor Wilkinson, a Professor of Craniofacial Identification in the Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification at the University of Dundee, Scotland, will present on 2 separate topics, drawing on her experience and expertise in craniofacial identification, facial image analysis, depiction of the dead and facial recognition for identification.

Facial Image Comparison Basic Training:
The 3 hour workshop provides basic training in facial image comparison for identification of the living.

Depiction of the Dead:
This presentation discusses the challenges associated with the identification of the deceased from facial appearance, in relation to soft tissue reconstruction and skeletal assessment.

^ Top of Page

Constable Chris Young

Constable Young has been a member of the RCMP for 9 years and has served as both a uniform and plain clothes investigator. He has been a member of the National Weapons Enforcement Support team since 2009 and has received specialized training in “Characteristics of an Armed Person” along with other advanced firearms courses.

Presentation Topic:

Constable Paul Roche and Constable Chris Young:

As witnessed through videos, media reports, and officer experiences, individuals possess or have access to firearms on a more frequent basis. As such, in the interest of public and personal safety, it is extremely important for front-line police officers to be able to recognize the signs and indications that an individual is armed. Together, Cst. Roche and Cst. Young will conduct a presentation that will provide information to the delegates that will allow them to:

  1. Determine an individual's dominant side
  2. Distinguish methods and types of firearm concealment and positioning of makeshift holsters
  3. Identify the body movements and behavioral patterns of an armed person
  4. Recognize the clothing characteristics of an armed person
  5. Identify characteristics relative to stopping a vehicle containing an armed person

^ Top of Page

Superintendent Paul Young

Superintendent Young has been a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for almost 30 years. Following engagement into the RCMP, at St. Johns, Newfoundland, he has pursued a career that has seen him take on policing duties in five provinces, two territories and three international posts. From a management and international perspective, following several detachment and district commands within the RCMP, in 2000 he was appointed Chief of the Joint Task Force for the UN mission in Sarajevo, Bosnia. Here he led an international major crime team composed of more than 50 police officers from 14 nations. Following this assignment Supt. Young became the first operations Officer for the Southern Alberta District at Calgary, Alberta. In 2003 he returned to his passion for aboriginal policing and became the Criminal Operations Officer for Nunavut. In 2007 Supt. Young volunteered for service in Afghanistan and served with the American Military, Combined Security Transition Command, as the Senior Police Advisor to the Chief of the Kabul Police Force. For the next year he assisted in the command of this 11 thousand person force. Returning from Afghanistan Supt. Young became the Director of International Peace Operations Branch for the RCMP overseeing the deployment of more than 240 Canadian police Officers, from more than 20 police agencies, to 14 different conflict nations. Superintendent Young is currently Canadas Police Advisor to The Permanent Mission of Canada to the United Nations located in new York.

Superintendent Young is a graduate of Memorial University of Newfoundland and has an educational background in Psychology, Criminology, Advanced police Studies and Business Administration.

Presentation Topic:

Superintendent Young's presentation will briefly outline the historical perspective of UN peacekeeping operations. The vision for the future. How are things about to change on the international front. The challenges currently being faced in deploying international police officers and specifically the challenge as it relates to UN Resolution 1325. i.e. An increase of female officers abroad and an increase of qualified female officers in management positions.

This workshop will aim to position UN peacekeeping operations as it relates to international police officers deploying abroad. It will focus on past practices, the way forward and current challenges being faced. Emphasis will be placed on steps being taken to face these challenges. The challenge of placing more female police abroad will be explored. An opportunity for open discussion and questions is included.

^ Top of Page